shipperx: (Hunger Games - Mockingjay)
Finnick has been cast (and yes, he's cute).

From EW.com:

http://insidemovies.ew.com/2012/08/22/hunger-games-catching-fire-finnick-sam-claflin/

Ending weeks of speculation, Sam Claflin (Snow White and the Huntsman) has officially been cast as the dashing former Hunger Games champion Finnick Odair in The Hunger Games: Catching Fire, Lionsgate announced today. The British-born Claflin, 24, had been the front-runner for the coveted role since mid-July.

Of all the new characters in Catching Fire, Finnick looms largest. After he won his Hunger Games for District 4 when he 14 thanks to his prowess with a trident, Finnick’s rakish good looks and louche charm helped him become something of a celebrity in the Capitol. (MILD SPOILERS AHEAD!)



Along with Katniss Everdeen (Jennifer Lawrence) and Peeta Mellark (Josh Hutcherson), the 24-year-old Finnick is among the previous champions forced to return to the arena for the 75th annual Hunger Games, also known as the Quarter Quell. Katniss is initially wary of him — in Suzanne Collins’ bestseller, when they first meet, Finnick is wearing nothing but a fishing net with some strategically placed knots. But along with his former mentor Mags (Lynn Cohen), Finnick proves to be a powerful ally



shipperx: (Hunger Games - Mockingjay)
Finnick has been cast (and yes, he's cute).

From EW.com:

http://insidemovies.ew.com/2012/08/22/hunger-games-catching-fire-finnick-sam-claflin/

Ending weeks of speculation, Sam Claflin (Snow White and the Huntsman) has officially been cast as the dashing former Hunger Games champion Finnick Odair in The Hunger Games: Catching Fire, Lionsgate announced today. The British-born Claflin, 24, had been the front-runner for the coveted role since mid-July.

Of all the new characters in Catching Fire, Finnick looms largest. After he won his Hunger Games for District 4 when he 14 thanks to his prowess with a trident, Finnick’s rakish good looks and louche charm helped him become something of a celebrity in the Capitol. (MILD SPOILERS AHEAD!)



Along with Katniss Everdeen (Jennifer Lawrence) and Peeta Mellark (Josh Hutcherson), the 24-year-old Finnick is among the previous champions forced to return to the arena for the 75th annual Hunger Games, also known as the Quarter Quell. Katniss is initially wary of him — in Suzanne Collins’ bestseller, when they first meet, Finnick is wearing nothing but a fishing net with some strategically placed knots. But along with his former mentor Mags (Lynn Cohen), Finnick proves to be a powerful ally



shipperx: (Hunger Games - Mockingjay)
From EW.com:

'The Hunger Games' ignites the ALA's list of most challenged books

The Hunger Games movie may not have had trouble earning a PG-13 rating, but many parents and educators are wondering whether the best-selling book trilogy belongs on library shelves. The American Library Association’s Office for Intellectual Freedom released its annual list of most frequently challenged books of 2011 yesterday, and the increased popularity of Suzanne Collins’ dystopian saga — in large part fueled by buzz surrounding the blockbuster film — drove the books higher on the list. In 2010, only the first novel cracked the top ten at number five. In 2011, all three books occupy the number three position, and the complaints have grown more varied: “anti-ethnic; anti-family; insensitivity; offensive language; occult/satanic; violence.”

The ALA keeps track of challenges filed and counted 326 reported attempts to restrict or remove books from schools and libraries in 2011. The association defines a challenge as “a formal, written complaint filed with a library or school requesting that a book or other material be restricted or removed because of its content or appropriateness.”

Barbara Jones, director of the ALA’s Office for Intellectual Freedom, told the Associated Press that many of the complaints leveled against The Hunger Games books focused on the film version directed by Gary Ross. “There was complaining about the choice of actors for the film,” she said. “You had people saying someone was dark-skinned in the book, but not in the film, or dark-skinned in the film and not in the book. In general, a lot more people were aware of the books and that led to more kinds of complaints.”

Lauren Myracle, a regular on these types of lists, came in at number one with her epistolary Internet Girl books. But the book that topped the list last year — And Tango Makes Three, about two male penguins who raise a baby chick together — didn’t crack the top ten. Jones said she’d like to believe that people are becoming more tolerant of homosexuality, but it may just be that other books are attracting more attention.

The Hunger Games: Get the latest news, photos, and more

What do you think about the complaints against The Hunger Games books? “Violence,” I get, but can you see why anyone would call them “anti-family” or “anti-ethnic”?



Anti-ethnic? Are these the folks complaining that Rue wasn't white? Whu?
Also... Satanic? Whu-whu?

And finally... what 'bad language' was used anywhere in the story?
shipperx: (Hunger Games - Mockingjay)
From EW.com:

'The Hunger Games' ignites the ALA's list of most challenged books

The Hunger Games movie may not have had trouble earning a PG-13 rating, but many parents and educators are wondering whether the best-selling book trilogy belongs on library shelves. The American Library Association’s Office for Intellectual Freedom released its annual list of most frequently challenged books of 2011 yesterday, and the increased popularity of Suzanne Collins’ dystopian saga — in large part fueled by buzz surrounding the blockbuster film — drove the books higher on the list. In 2010, only the first novel cracked the top ten at number five. In 2011, all three books occupy the number three position, and the complaints have grown more varied: “anti-ethnic; anti-family; insensitivity; offensive language; occult/satanic; violence.”

The ALA keeps track of challenges filed and counted 326 reported attempts to restrict or remove books from schools and libraries in 2011. The association defines a challenge as “a formal, written complaint filed with a library or school requesting that a book or other material be restricted or removed because of its content or appropriateness.”

Barbara Jones, director of the ALA’s Office for Intellectual Freedom, told the Associated Press that many of the complaints leveled against The Hunger Games books focused on the film version directed by Gary Ross. “There was complaining about the choice of actors for the film,” she said. “You had people saying someone was dark-skinned in the book, but not in the film, or dark-skinned in the film and not in the book. In general, a lot more people were aware of the books and that led to more kinds of complaints.”

Lauren Myracle, a regular on these types of lists, came in at number one with her epistolary Internet Girl books. But the book that topped the list last year — And Tango Makes Three, about two male penguins who raise a baby chick together — didn’t crack the top ten. Jones said she’d like to believe that people are becoming more tolerant of homosexuality, but it may just be that other books are attracting more attention.

The Hunger Games: Get the latest news, photos, and more

What do you think about the complaints against The Hunger Games books? “Violence,” I get, but can you see why anyone would call them “anti-family” or “anti-ethnic”?



Anti-ethnic? Are these the folks complaining that Rue wasn't white? Whu?
Also... Satanic? Whu-whu?

And finally... what 'bad language' was used anywhere in the story?
shipperx: (Hunger Games - Mockingjay)
From EW.com:

'The Hunger Games' ignites the ALA's list of most challenged books

The Hunger Games movie may not have had trouble earning a PG-13 rating, but many parents and educators are wondering whether the best-selling book trilogy belongs on library shelves. The American Library Association’s Office for Intellectual Freedom released its annual list of most frequently challenged books of 2011 yesterday, and the increased popularity of Suzanne Collins’ dystopian saga — in large part fueled by buzz surrounding the blockbuster film — drove the books higher on the list. In 2010, only the first novel cracked the top ten at number five. In 2011, all three books occupy the number three position, and the complaints have grown more varied: “anti-ethnic; anti-family; insensitivity; offensive language; occult/satanic; violence.”

The ALA keeps track of challenges filed and counted 326 reported attempts to restrict or remove books from schools and libraries in 2011. The association defines a challenge as “a formal, written complaint filed with a library or school requesting that a book or other material be restricted or removed because of its content or appropriateness.”

Barbara Jones, director of the ALA’s Office for Intellectual Freedom, told the Associated Press that many of the complaints leveled against The Hunger Games books focused on the film version directed by Gary Ross. “There was complaining about the choice of actors for the film,” she said. “You had people saying someone was dark-skinned in the book, but not in the film, or dark-skinned in the film and not in the book. In general, a lot more people were aware of the books and that led to more kinds of complaints.”

Lauren Myracle, a regular on these types of lists, came in at number one with her epistolary Internet Girl books. But the book that topped the list last year — And Tango Makes Three, about two male penguins who raise a baby chick together — didn’t crack the top ten. Jones said she’d like to believe that people are becoming more tolerant of homosexuality, but it may just be that other books are attracting more attention.

The Hunger Games: Get the latest news, photos, and more

What do you think about the complaints against The Hunger Games books? “Violence,” I get, but can you see why anyone would call them “anti-family” or “anti-ethnic”?



Anti-ethnic? Are these the folks complaining that Rue wasn't white? Whu?
Also... Satanic? Whu-whu?

And finally... what 'bad language' was used anywhere in the story?
shipperx: (Hunger Games - Mockingjay)
Self Important Nitwit
Joel Stein: The only thing more embarrassing than catching a guy on the plane looking at pornography on his computer is seeing a guy on the plane reading “The Hunger Games.” {...} Or Harry Potter. The only time I’m O.K. with an adult holding a children’s book is if he’s moving his mouth as he reads.

I’m sure all those books are well written. So is “Horton Hatches the Egg.” But Horton doesn’t have the depth of language and character as literature written for people who have stopped physically growing.

I appreciate that adults occasionally watch Pixar movies or play video games. That’s fine. Those media don’t require much of your brains. Books are one of our few chances to learn. There’s a reason my teachers didn’t assign me to go home and play three hours of Donkey Kong.

I have no idea what “The Hunger Games” is like. Maybe there are complicated shades of good and evil in each character. Maybe there are Pynchonesque turns of phrase. Maybe it delves into issues of identity, self-justification and anomie that would make David Foster Wallace proud. I don’t know because it’s a book for kids. I’ll read “The Hunger Games” when I finish the previous 3,000 years of fiction written for adults.


Star Trek 2
Read more... )

Dr Who


Read more... )

True Blood

HBO has set an official season five premiere date for June 10


Game of Thrones:
Cersei:


Read more... )

Sansa:


Read more... )
shipperx: (Hunger Games - Mockingjay)
Self Important Nitwit
Joel Stein: The only thing more embarrassing than catching a guy on the plane looking at pornography on his computer is seeing a guy on the plane reading “The Hunger Games.” {...} Or Harry Potter. The only time I’m O.K. with an adult holding a children’s book is if he’s moving his mouth as he reads.

I’m sure all those books are well written. So is “Horton Hatches the Egg.” But Horton doesn’t have the depth of language and character as literature written for people who have stopped physically growing.

I appreciate that adults occasionally watch Pixar movies or play video games. That’s fine. Those media don’t require much of your brains. Books are one of our few chances to learn. There’s a reason my teachers didn’t assign me to go home and play three hours of Donkey Kong.

I have no idea what “The Hunger Games” is like. Maybe there are complicated shades of good and evil in each character. Maybe there are Pynchonesque turns of phrase. Maybe it delves into issues of identity, self-justification and anomie that would make David Foster Wallace proud. I don’t know because it’s a book for kids. I’ll read “The Hunger Games” when I finish the previous 3,000 years of fiction written for adults.


Star Trek 2
Read more... )

Dr Who


Read more... )

True Blood

HBO has set an official season five premiere date for June 10


Game of Thrones:
Cersei:


Read more... )

Sansa:


Read more... )
shipperx: (Hunger Games - Mockingjay)
Self Important Nitwit
Joel Stein: The only thing more embarrassing than catching a guy on the plane looking at pornography on his computer is seeing a guy on the plane reading “The Hunger Games.” {...} Or Harry Potter. The only time I’m O.K. with an adult holding a children’s book is if he’s moving his mouth as he reads.

I’m sure all those books are well written. So is “Horton Hatches the Egg.” But Horton doesn’t have the depth of language and character as literature written for people who have stopped physically growing.

I appreciate that adults occasionally watch Pixar movies or play video games. That’s fine. Those media don’t require much of your brains. Books are one of our few chances to learn. There’s a reason my teachers didn’t assign me to go home and play three hours of Donkey Kong.

I have no idea what “The Hunger Games” is like. Maybe there are complicated shades of good and evil in each character. Maybe there are Pynchonesque turns of phrase. Maybe it delves into issues of identity, self-justification and anomie that would make David Foster Wallace proud. I don’t know because it’s a book for kids. I’ll read “The Hunger Games” when I finish the previous 3,000 years of fiction written for adults.


Star Trek 2
Read more... )

Dr Who


Read more... )

True Blood

HBO has set an official season five premiere date for June 10


Game of Thrones:
Cersei:


Read more... )

Sansa:


Read more... )
shipperx: (30 Rock - Blerg)
From Huffingtonpost (via Jezebel):

It wasn't all good news for Team "Hunger Games" over the weekend. Despite fawning reviews and record-breaking ticket sales, some fans of the blockbuster young adult trilogy by author Suzanne Collins were upset by the decision to cast an African-American actress as Rue, one of the supporting characters. Never mind that she's described as having "dark brown skin" in the original book.

As Jezebel notes, many "Hunger Games" viewers resorted to sending racist tweets over the fact that Rue (played in the film by young actress Amandla Sternberg) was black.

"Why does Rue have to be black," wrote one ignorant fan, whose Twitter page no longer exists. "Not gonna lie, kinda ruined the movie."

Another girl wanted to know "why they 'made all the good characters black.' "

"Awkward moment when Rue is some black girl and not the innocent blonde girl you picture," wrote another user, whose account has also been deleted.


As who pictured? Racists or people who lack basic reading comprehension? 

Rue's description in the book:

…And most hauntingly, a twelve-year-old girl from District 11. She has dark brown skin and eyes, but other than that she's very like Prim in size and demeanor…

(elsewhere she's described as having 'dark satiny brown skin'

Thresh's description in the book:

The boy tribute from District 11, Thresh, has the same dark skin as Rue, but the resemblance stops there. He's one of the giants, probably six and half feet tall...


Rue and Thresh were unambiguously characters of color in the book. (As are Rue's and Thresh's families in "Catching Fire.")  What next? These same 'readers' missed the distinct implication that the "adjacent to District 12/Appalachia) District 11 happens to mostly likely be the deep South (and the history that evokes) ... and possibly some of the grain producing mid-West (as 11 was distinctly agrarian).  Did they miss that too?

And even if those characters weren't cast to look exactly the way that they were described in the books (even though they are)  SO WHAT?!  Cinna is played by a bi-racial man in the movie, though I don't recall Cinna's race being discussed in the novels (so he's open to just about any interpretation.)  And, you know what?  It just means that Lenny Kravitz got a job.  It doesn't 'change' Cinna in any way!

Also, why is it upsetting that 'the good characters' are black?  1) Do Peeta, Prim, Haymitch, and Gale not count as 'good"?  2) Does having three 'good' black characters strike them as an 'imbalance'?!!  WTH?

Guh.  People are stupid.
shipperx: (30 Rock - Blerg)
From Huffingtonpost (via Jezebel):

It wasn't all good news for Team "Hunger Games" over the weekend. Despite fawning reviews and record-breaking ticket sales, some fans of the blockbuster young adult trilogy by author Suzanne Collins were upset by the decision to cast an African-American actress as Rue, one of the supporting characters. Never mind that she's described as having "dark brown skin" in the original book.

As Jezebel notes, many "Hunger Games" viewers resorted to sending racist tweets over the fact that Rue (played in the film by young actress Amandla Sternberg) was black.

"Why does Rue have to be black," wrote one ignorant fan, whose Twitter page no longer exists. "Not gonna lie, kinda ruined the movie."

Another girl wanted to know "why they 'made all the good characters black.' "

"Awkward moment when Rue is some black girl and not the innocent blonde girl you picture," wrote another user, whose account has also been deleted.


As who pictured? Racists or people who lack basic reading comprehension? 

Rue's description in the book:

…And most hauntingly, a twelve-year-old girl from District 11. She has dark brown skin and eyes, but other than that she's very like Prim in size and demeanor…

(elsewhere she's described as having 'dark satiny brown skin'

Thresh's description in the book:

The boy tribute from District 11, Thresh, has the same dark skin as Rue, but the resemblance stops there. He's one of the giants, probably six and half feet tall...


Rue and Thresh were unambiguously characters of color in the book. (As are Rue's and Thresh's families in "Catching Fire.")  What next? These same 'readers' missed the distinct implication that the "adjacent to District 12/Appalachia) District 11 happens to mostly likely be the deep South (and the history that evokes) ... and possibly some of the grain producing mid-West (as 11 was distinctly agrarian).  Did they miss that too?

And even if those characters weren't cast to look exactly the way that they were described in the books (even though they are)  SO WHAT?!  Cinna is played by a bi-racial man in the movie, though I don't recall Cinna's race being discussed in the novels (so he's open to just about any interpretation.)  And, you know what?  It just means that Lenny Kravitz got a job.  It doesn't 'change' Cinna in any way!

Also, why is it upsetting that 'the good characters' are black?  1) Do Peeta, Prim, Haymitch, and Gale not count as 'good"?  2) Does having three 'good' black characters strike them as an 'imbalance'?!!  WTH?

Guh.  People are stupid.
shipperx: (30 Rock - Blerg)
From Huffingtonpost (via Jezebel):

It wasn't all good news for Team "Hunger Games" over the weekend. Despite fawning reviews and record-breaking ticket sales, some fans of the blockbuster young adult trilogy by author Suzanne Collins were upset by the decision to cast an African-American actress as Rue, one of the supporting characters. Never mind that she's described as having "dark brown skin" in the original book.

As Jezebel notes, many "Hunger Games" viewers resorted to sending racist tweets over the fact that Rue (played in the film by young actress Amandla Sternberg) was black.

"Why does Rue have to be black," wrote one ignorant fan, whose Twitter page no longer exists. "Not gonna lie, kinda ruined the movie."

Another girl wanted to know "why they 'made all the good characters black.' "

"Awkward moment when Rue is some black girl and not the innocent blonde girl you picture," wrote another user, whose account has also been deleted.


As who pictured? Racists or people who lack basic reading comprehension? 

Rue's description in the book:

…And most hauntingly, a twelve-year-old girl from District 11. She has dark brown skin and eyes, but other than that she's very like Prim in size and demeanor…

(elsewhere she's described as having 'dark satiny brown skin'

Thresh's description in the book:

The boy tribute from District 11, Thresh, has the same dark skin as Rue, but the resemblance stops there. He's one of the giants, probably six and half feet tall...


Rue and Thresh were unambiguously characters of color in the book. (As are Rue's and Thresh's families in "Catching Fire.")  What next? These same 'readers' missed the distinct implication that the "adjacent to District 12/Appalachia) District 11 happens to mostly likely be the deep South (and the history that evokes) ... and possibly some of the grain producing mid-West (as 11 was distinctly agrarian).  Did they miss that too?

And even if those characters weren't cast to look exactly the way that they were described in the books (even though they are)  SO WHAT?!  Cinna is played by a bi-racial man in the movie, though I don't recall Cinna's race being discussed in the novels (so he's open to just about any interpretation.)  And, you know what?  It just means that Lenny Kravitz got a job.  It doesn't 'change' Cinna in any way!

Also, why is it upsetting that 'the good characters' are black?  1) Do Peeta, Prim, Haymitch, and Gale not count as 'good"?  2) Does having three 'good' black characters strike them as an 'imbalance'?!!  WTH?

Guh.  People are stupid.
shipperx: (Hunger Games - Mockingjay)
Article about The Hunger Games:

Excerpt: 

What's the appropriate soundtrack for kids killing kids?" Entertainment Weekly asks in regard to the soundtrack for the highly-anticipated movie The Hunger Games that premieres in the U.S. on Friday, March 23. If you're a grown-up, maybe you're appalled by that question. And maybe you'll be even more appalled to know that millions of young people are so excited about the premiere that they've already made the movie one of the top-selling films ever on Fandango.

But before you choose to be appalled by a work of fiction or by a film adaptation, it's good to know that the concept that fuels The Hunger Games is both unthinkable and ever-thinkable, since it's a story that seems to get told over and over again. Equal parts dystopian classics like 1984 and Brave New World and pop-culture barnburners like Death Race 2000, The Running Man, and the Japanese kid-slaughter Battle Royale,

The Hunger Games reflects our secret and not-so-secret fears, which helps explain why it has captured more young readers than any recent books that don't feature Harry Potter or sparkly vampires  {...}  Setting aside whether something is good or not so good (Twilight in my estimation is not so good, and yet there are screaming audiences for it), people are often drawn to a work at a given moment because it exudes a peculiar relevance for them {...} that help explain why Publishers Weekly called The Hunger Games "the right book at the right time."

The Hunger Games is a powerful metaphor for the Great Recession, for this moment when even younger readers may be aware that their parents or older siblings are struggling to make ends meet in an increasingly dog-eat-dog economy. It's only a slightly-exaggerated look at our "reality TV" culture.   And it reflects our long-running military adventures {...} 

Some of the early reviews (of the movie) from England tell us what the book and the previews have already shown us: that, as The Guardian put it, "the America of The Hunger Games looks a lot like the 30s Depression." And that vision of economic hardship is as it should be -- a narrative that shows young people competing to the death against each other so that those they love can have enough to eat is just a more-violent version of the Ayn Randian capitalism {...} God help anybody who falls under the wheels, because nobody else will.

Panem, the nation where The Hunger Games takes place, is the Latin word for "bread," and clearly related to the Latin phrase "panem et circenses" -- "bread and circuses." Author Suzanne Collins intended that The Hunger Games satirize our culture, where we watch "real life" on television and are thus distracted from our own real lives.  As the Romans knew, if the people are entertained, they are less likely to notice {...}


An Early Review of the Movie:

An Excerpt:

{...} The film is set in the post-apocalyptic country of Panem, which is divided into twelve districts. Each year, every district must offer up a girl and a boy to take part in the eponymous games, a brutal fight to the death, which is screened across the country and controlled by an overseeing producer.

Katniss Evergreen (Jennifer Lawrence) a resident of one of the poorest districts, lives with her mother and younger sister Primrose. Unable to find work, she scours the countryside for food, hunting squirrels and birds. When the Reaping, the selection of the two entrants to the Hunger Games picks out Primrose and a baker's son Peeta Mellark (Josh Hutcherson), Katniss offers herself as a volunteer in place of her sister. Peeta and Katniss travel to the Capitol. After five days of training, they are pitched against the other twenty two entrants, only one of which will emerge victorious.

Before the film has been released, there has been argument over how much of a debt the film owes to Battle Royale (2000), the Japanese film in which high school students are forced to compete towards the same grizzly outcome. Yet while The Hunger Games does share certain similarities with Battle Royale, the scenario employed by both films is used to ask different questions about the nature of different societies. Battle Royale can be seen as a satirical take on the Japanese authorities' hostility towards a youth culture which it refuses to countenance or attempt to understand. The Hunger Games, on the other hand, is more concerned with the Western world's relationship with violence and reality television.

In the run-up to the film's release, star of the film Jennifer Lawrence compared the film's subject material to the very public breakdown of reality TV star Kim Kardashian's marriage. This, a very tragic and supposedly private event, was knowingly recorded on camera and then broadcast for entertainment. In the same way that reality television is edited and staged to affect an emotional response from the viewer, in the film we see both Katniss and Peeta complicit in manipulating the audience to ensure their own survival.

Yet although the subject material is compelling, does it make for an entertaining film? The answer for the most part is yes. The film is not didactic and grants the audience the intelligence to grasp with the issues that the narrative is conveying. As the film's lead, Jennifer Lawrence carries on her good work from Winter's Bone, with a performance that mixes gritty stoicism with vulnerability, unable to withstand the realities of the horrors she is being asked to carry out in the name of public entertainment {...}


 
shipperx: (Hunger Games - Mockingjay)
Article about The Hunger Games:

Excerpt: 

What's the appropriate soundtrack for kids killing kids?" Entertainment Weekly asks in regard to the soundtrack for the highly-anticipated movie The Hunger Games that premieres in the U.S. on Friday, March 23. If you're a grown-up, maybe you're appalled by that question. And maybe you'll be even more appalled to know that millions of young people are so excited about the premiere that they've already made the movie one of the top-selling films ever on Fandango.

But before you choose to be appalled by a work of fiction or by a film adaptation, it's good to know that the concept that fuels The Hunger Games is both unthinkable and ever-thinkable, since it's a story that seems to get told over and over again. Equal parts dystopian classics like 1984 and Brave New World and pop-culture barnburners like Death Race 2000, The Running Man, and the Japanese kid-slaughter Battle Royale,

The Hunger Games reflects our secret and not-so-secret fears, which helps explain why it has captured more young readers than any recent books that don't feature Harry Potter or sparkly vampires  {...}  Setting aside whether something is good or not so good (Twilight in my estimation is not so good, and yet there are screaming audiences for it), people are often drawn to a work at a given moment because it exudes a peculiar relevance for them {...} that help explain why Publishers Weekly called The Hunger Games "the right book at the right time."

The Hunger Games is a powerful metaphor for the Great Recession, for this moment when even younger readers may be aware that their parents or older siblings are struggling to make ends meet in an increasingly dog-eat-dog economy. It's only a slightly-exaggerated look at our "reality TV" culture.   And it reflects our long-running military adventures {...} 

Some of the early reviews (of the movie) from England tell us what the book and the previews have already shown us: that, as The Guardian put it, "the America of The Hunger Games looks a lot like the 30s Depression." And that vision of economic hardship is as it should be -- a narrative that shows young people competing to the death against each other so that those they love can have enough to eat is just a more-violent version of the Ayn Randian capitalism {...} God help anybody who falls under the wheels, because nobody else will.

Panem, the nation where The Hunger Games takes place, is the Latin word for "bread," and clearly related to the Latin phrase "panem et circenses" -- "bread and circuses." Author Suzanne Collins intended that The Hunger Games satirize our culture, where we watch "real life" on television and are thus distracted from our own real lives.  As the Romans knew, if the people are entertained, they are less likely to notice {...}


An Early Review of the Movie:

An Excerpt:

{...} The film is set in the post-apocalyptic country of Panem, which is divided into twelve districts. Each year, every district must offer up a girl and a boy to take part in the eponymous games, a brutal fight to the death, which is screened across the country and controlled by an overseeing producer.

Katniss Evergreen (Jennifer Lawrence) a resident of one of the poorest districts, lives with her mother and younger sister Primrose. Unable to find work, she scours the countryside for food, hunting squirrels and birds. When the Reaping, the selection of the two entrants to the Hunger Games picks out Primrose and a baker's son Peeta Mellark (Josh Hutcherson), Katniss offers herself as a volunteer in place of her sister. Peeta and Katniss travel to the Capitol. After five days of training, they are pitched against the other twenty two entrants, only one of which will emerge victorious.

Before the film has been released, there has been argument over how much of a debt the film owes to Battle Royale (2000), the Japanese film in which high school students are forced to compete towards the same grizzly outcome. Yet while The Hunger Games does share certain similarities with Battle Royale, the scenario employed by both films is used to ask different questions about the nature of different societies. Battle Royale can be seen as a satirical take on the Japanese authorities' hostility towards a youth culture which it refuses to countenance or attempt to understand. The Hunger Games, on the other hand, is more concerned with the Western world's relationship with violence and reality television.

In the run-up to the film's release, star of the film Jennifer Lawrence compared the film's subject material to the very public breakdown of reality TV star Kim Kardashian's marriage. This, a very tragic and supposedly private event, was knowingly recorded on camera and then broadcast for entertainment. In the same way that reality television is edited and staged to affect an emotional response from the viewer, in the film we see both Katniss and Peeta complicit in manipulating the audience to ensure their own survival.

Yet although the subject material is compelling, does it make for an entertaining film? The answer for the most part is yes. The film is not didactic and grants the audience the intelligence to grasp with the issues that the narrative is conveying. As the film's lead, Jennifer Lawrence carries on her good work from Winter's Bone, with a performance that mixes gritty stoicism with vulnerability, unable to withstand the realities of the horrors she is being asked to carry out in the name of public entertainment {...}


 
shipperx: (Hunger Games - Mockingjay)
Article about The Hunger Games:

Excerpt: 

What's the appropriate soundtrack for kids killing kids?" Entertainment Weekly asks in regard to the soundtrack for the highly-anticipated movie The Hunger Games that premieres in the U.S. on Friday, March 23. If you're a grown-up, maybe you're appalled by that question. And maybe you'll be even more appalled to know that millions of young people are so excited about the premiere that they've already made the movie one of the top-selling films ever on Fandango.

But before you choose to be appalled by a work of fiction or by a film adaptation, it's good to know that the concept that fuels The Hunger Games is both unthinkable and ever-thinkable, since it's a story that seems to get told over and over again. Equal parts dystopian classics like 1984 and Brave New World and pop-culture barnburners like Death Race 2000, The Running Man, and the Japanese kid-slaughter Battle Royale,

The Hunger Games reflects our secret and not-so-secret fears, which helps explain why it has captured more young readers than any recent books that don't feature Harry Potter or sparkly vampires  {...}  Setting aside whether something is good or not so good (Twilight in my estimation is not so good, and yet there are screaming audiences for it), people are often drawn to a work at a given moment because it exudes a peculiar relevance for them {...} that help explain why Publishers Weekly called The Hunger Games "the right book at the right time."

The Hunger Games is a powerful metaphor for the Great Recession, for this moment when even younger readers may be aware that their parents or older siblings are struggling to make ends meet in an increasingly dog-eat-dog economy. It's only a slightly-exaggerated look at our "reality TV" culture.   And it reflects our long-running military adventures {...} 

Some of the early reviews (of the movie) from England tell us what the book and the previews have already shown us: that, as The Guardian put it, "the America of The Hunger Games looks a lot like the 30s Depression." And that vision of economic hardship is as it should be -- a narrative that shows young people competing to the death against each other so that those they love can have enough to eat is just a more-violent version of the Ayn Randian capitalism {...} God help anybody who falls under the wheels, because nobody else will.

Panem, the nation where The Hunger Games takes place, is the Latin word for "bread," and clearly related to the Latin phrase "panem et circenses" -- "bread and circuses." Author Suzanne Collins intended that The Hunger Games satirize our culture, where we watch "real life" on television and are thus distracted from our own real lives.  As the Romans knew, if the people are entertained, they are less likely to notice {...}


An Early Review of the Movie:

An Excerpt:

{...} The film is set in the post-apocalyptic country of Panem, which is divided into twelve districts. Each year, every district must offer up a girl and a boy to take part in the eponymous games, a brutal fight to the death, which is screened across the country and controlled by an overseeing producer.

Katniss Evergreen (Jennifer Lawrence) a resident of one of the poorest districts, lives with her mother and younger sister Primrose. Unable to find work, she scours the countryside for food, hunting squirrels and birds. When the Reaping, the selection of the two entrants to the Hunger Games picks out Primrose and a baker's son Peeta Mellark (Josh Hutcherson), Katniss offers herself as a volunteer in place of her sister. Peeta and Katniss travel to the Capitol. After five days of training, they are pitched against the other twenty two entrants, only one of which will emerge victorious.

Before the film has been released, there has been argument over how much of a debt the film owes to Battle Royale (2000), the Japanese film in which high school students are forced to compete towards the same grizzly outcome. Yet while The Hunger Games does share certain similarities with Battle Royale, the scenario employed by both films is used to ask different questions about the nature of different societies. Battle Royale can be seen as a satirical take on the Japanese authorities' hostility towards a youth culture which it refuses to countenance or attempt to understand. The Hunger Games, on the other hand, is more concerned with the Western world's relationship with violence and reality television.

In the run-up to the film's release, star of the film Jennifer Lawrence compared the film's subject material to the very public breakdown of reality TV star Kim Kardashian's marriage. This, a very tragic and supposedly private event, was knowingly recorded on camera and then broadcast for entertainment. In the same way that reality television is edited and staged to affect an emotional response from the viewer, in the film we see both Katniss and Peeta complicit in manipulating the audience to ensure their own survival.

Yet although the subject material is compelling, does it make for an entertaining film? The answer for the most part is yes. The film is not didactic and grants the audience the intelligence to grasp with the issues that the narrative is conveying. As the film's lead, Jennifer Lawrence carries on her good work from Winter's Bone, with a performance that mixes gritty stoicism with vulnerability, unable to withstand the realities of the horrors she is being asked to carry out in the name of public entertainment {...}


 
shipperx: (Hunger Games - Katniss)
A real Hunger Games trailer -- woohoo!

shipperx: (Hunger Games - Katniss)
A real Hunger Games trailer -- woohoo!

shipperx: (Hunger Games - Katniss)
A real Hunger Games trailer -- woohoo!

HG Stuff

Mar. 31st, 2011 12:52 pm
shipperx: (Aeryn - Girl With Gun)

From Screen Rant:

After Lawrence was confirmed as Katniss, speculation turned to who might be playing the role of Peeta Mellark – a fellow contestant in the titular games who’s been carrying a torch for Katniss for several years. Now, THR has revealed a list of up-and-coming young actors that the studio is considering for the role. They also have a rundown of who’s being eyed for the part of Gale Hawthorne – Katniss’ good friend and hunting partner.

As far as Peeta is concerned, it looks like a few names that have popped up in the past are still in the running – specifically, Josh Hutcherson and Hunter Parrish.

The list also includes Alexander Ludwig, Lucas Till, and Evan Peters.

Interestingly, it looks like Alex Pettyfer (I Am Number Four) is no longer in consideration.

For the part of Gale, THR claims that the studio’s list includes names like Liam Hemsworth, David Henrie, Robbie Amell, and Drew Roy.



All You Need To Know About 'The Hunger Games'
from Cheat Sheet:

 

If you've never read the books, you might be wondering why fans are so rabid about this series of books, why they're so invested in the casting of the lead, and what you might be expecting to see in theaters in 2012.  That's why we've decided to make "Hunger Games" the first entry in our Cheat Sheet series, and hopefully by the end of this article, you'll be able to observe the rest of the casting and the crazy hype with an expert's eye.

And who knows?  Maybe a few of you will even be motivated to pick up the novels by Suzanne Collins as a result.

I did not follow along as the books were being published.  I picked up a bundle of all three novels, Hunger Games, Catching Fire, and Mockingjay, at Costco one afternoon for something like $25.  By that point, Gary Ross was already attached to direct the films based on a screenplay by Billy Ray, and so I cracked open the first book with a sense of obligation.  After all, many of these kid-lit fads are genuinely awful books that catch on because of whichever potent wish-fulfillment fantasy they tap instead of any actual merit or quality in the writing.

That is not the case with these books.  Suzanne Collins is a talented writer with a great sense of both character and pace.  She has created an interesting world, one that exists largely on the allegorical level, and she has peopled it with characters that are easy to like and that are recognizably human.  The books grapple with ideas about society, relationships, and personal responsibility, but they do so without ever sacrificing the fundamental value of a good yarn well-told.  Taken as a whole, I think it's a great read, playing with some pretty familiar archetypes and ideas in a way that makes it feel fresh and urgent and, yes, personal.
 
The dystopian nation of Panem:
Read more... )
The Districts:
Read more... )
Katniss Everdeen:
Read more... )
Peeta Mellark:
Read more... )

That's the hardest part about the first book's set-up, emotionally.  These kids walk in knowing that 23 of them will die, no matter what.  That's what the Hunger Games are, and what they've always been.  So even the tributes from the 12 different Districts can't really rely on one another, since they know they can't both survive.  They are not players.  They are not contestants.  They are resigned to death walking in the door.  They are, indeed, tributes.

There's an added element to the way the reaping works that is fairly grim.  It involves the tesserae each family receives each year.  That's a government-controlled allotment of grain and oil, and it's very small, barely enough for one person.  The only way to get an additional tesserae is to put your name in the reaping an extra time, and you can do as many as one per family member for your whole family.  It increases your chances of getting picked, of course, but it also keeps your family alive.  And each year, you put that many more in again, with all the old ones still in there, so someone could have dozens of entries with their name on it in the reaping by the time they finally turn 18.  The name of the Hunger Games is both appropriate and also a blatant insult to all those forced to participate in it.

The 'Reward' (Other than post-traumatic stress):
Read more... )
Haymitch:
Read more... )The bad guy, President Snow:Read more... )
Let the games begin...
Read more... )
Gale Hawthorne:
Read more... )

The Sequels "Catching Fire" and "Mockingjay":
Read more... )

Katniss Everdeen is a complicated character, and she makes bad decisions sometimes, but she is always painted as someone who is at heart decent, and who genuinely wants to do the right thing.  The role is a gift for Lawrence, and  "Winter's Bone" could not have been a more perfect audition for this film.  She feels like a very real member of that community in that film, and there is a hard adulthood that seems at odd with the soft, young quality of her face.  Lawrence  carries sadness and coiled wariness with her at all times in that film, and it seems like she'll have to draw on a lot of the same qualities when she plays Katniss.

In finding her, they can now cast Peeta and Gale around her, so they are the right ages, and they can also find a Haymitch who has a rapport with her.  It's not a huge cast, considering the scope of the story they're telling, but there are a lot of supporting characters who come and go, and so my guess is there will be a lot of guest appearances, familiar faces in smaller roles, designed to fill the world out without breaking the bank.

This is a big gamble for Lionsgate, but a good one.  They've got great source material, a finite story to tell, and they're treating it like a prestige movie. 

Short of revealing every plot twist, that's pretty much all you need to know to jump into a "Hunger Games" conversation with authority.  You can grumble now along with the hardcore fans about how they need to cast Hugh Laurie for Haymitch, and you can pick a side in the Peeta/Gale debate, knowing full well that either side could be right.  And if all of this sounds good to you, don't wait for the movies.  Pick up the books by Collins and enjoy her version first.  They're a quick read, and this is a case where you have no reason to be ashamed to be seen with the books.  There's nothing guilty about the pleasures they offer, and I hope this is just the start for Collins as a storyteller, and that she's not done after this one story.

HG Stuff

Mar. 31st, 2011 12:52 pm
shipperx: (Aeryn - Girl With Gun)

From Screen Rant:

After Lawrence was confirmed as Katniss, speculation turned to who might be playing the role of Peeta Mellark – a fellow contestant in the titular games who’s been carrying a torch for Katniss for several years. Now, THR has revealed a list of up-and-coming young actors that the studio is considering for the role. They also have a rundown of who’s being eyed for the part of Gale Hawthorne – Katniss’ good friend and hunting partner.

As far as Peeta is concerned, it looks like a few names that have popped up in the past are still in the running – specifically, Josh Hutcherson and Hunter Parrish.

The list also includes Alexander Ludwig, Lucas Till, and Evan Peters.

Interestingly, it looks like Alex Pettyfer (I Am Number Four) is no longer in consideration.

For the part of Gale, THR claims that the studio’s list includes names like Liam Hemsworth, David Henrie, Robbie Amell, and Drew Roy.



All You Need To Know About 'The Hunger Games'
from Cheat Sheet:

 

If you've never read the books, you might be wondering why fans are so rabid about this series of books, why they're so invested in the casting of the lead, and what you might be expecting to see in theaters in 2012.  That's why we've decided to make "Hunger Games" the first entry in our Cheat Sheet series, and hopefully by the end of this article, you'll be able to observe the rest of the casting and the crazy hype with an expert's eye.

And who knows?  Maybe a few of you will even be motivated to pick up the novels by Suzanne Collins as a result.

I did not follow along as the books were being published.  I picked up a bundle of all three novels, Hunger Games, Catching Fire, and Mockingjay, at Costco one afternoon for something like $25.  By that point, Gary Ross was already attached to direct the films based on a screenplay by Billy Ray, and so I cracked open the first book with a sense of obligation.  After all, many of these kid-lit fads are genuinely awful books that catch on because of whichever potent wish-fulfillment fantasy they tap instead of any actual merit or quality in the writing.

That is not the case with these books.  Suzanne Collins is a talented writer with a great sense of both character and pace.  She has created an interesting world, one that exists largely on the allegorical level, and she has peopled it with characters that are easy to like and that are recognizably human.  The books grapple with ideas about society, relationships, and personal responsibility, but they do so without ever sacrificing the fundamental value of a good yarn well-told.  Taken as a whole, I think it's a great read, playing with some pretty familiar archetypes and ideas in a way that makes it feel fresh and urgent and, yes, personal.
 
The dystopian nation of Panem:
Read more... )
The Districts:
Read more... )
Katniss Everdeen:
Read more... )
Peeta Mellark:
Read more... )

That's the hardest part about the first book's set-up, emotionally.  These kids walk in knowing that 23 of them will die, no matter what.  That's what the Hunger Games are, and what they've always been.  So even the tributes from the 12 different Districts can't really rely on one another, since they know they can't both survive.  They are not players.  They are not contestants.  They are resigned to death walking in the door.  They are, indeed, tributes.

There's an added element to the way the reaping works that is fairly grim.  It involves the tesserae each family receives each year.  That's a government-controlled allotment of grain and oil, and it's very small, barely enough for one person.  The only way to get an additional tesserae is to put your name in the reaping an extra time, and you can do as many as one per family member for your whole family.  It increases your chances of getting picked, of course, but it also keeps your family alive.  And each year, you put that many more in again, with all the old ones still in there, so someone could have dozens of entries with their name on it in the reaping by the time they finally turn 18.  The name of the Hunger Games is both appropriate and also a blatant insult to all those forced to participate in it.

The 'Reward' (Other than post-traumatic stress):
Read more... )
Haymitch:
Read more... )The bad guy, President Snow:Read more... )
Let the games begin...
Read more... )
Gale Hawthorne:
Read more... )

The Sequels "Catching Fire" and "Mockingjay":
Read more... )

Katniss Everdeen is a complicated character, and she makes bad decisions sometimes, but she is always painted as someone who is at heart decent, and who genuinely wants to do the right thing.  The role is a gift for Lawrence, and  "Winter's Bone" could not have been a more perfect audition for this film.  She feels like a very real member of that community in that film, and there is a hard adulthood that seems at odd with the soft, young quality of her face.  Lawrence  carries sadness and coiled wariness with her at all times in that film, and it seems like she'll have to draw on a lot of the same qualities when she plays Katniss.

In finding her, they can now cast Peeta and Gale around her, so they are the right ages, and they can also find a Haymitch who has a rapport with her.  It's not a huge cast, considering the scope of the story they're telling, but there are a lot of supporting characters who come and go, and so my guess is there will be a lot of guest appearances, familiar faces in smaller roles, designed to fill the world out without breaking the bank.

This is a big gamble for Lionsgate, but a good one.  They've got great source material, a finite story to tell, and they're treating it like a prestige movie. 

Short of revealing every plot twist, that's pretty much all you need to know to jump into a "Hunger Games" conversation with authority.  You can grumble now along with the hardcore fans about how they need to cast Hugh Laurie for Haymitch, and you can pick a side in the Peeta/Gale debate, knowing full well that either side could be right.  And if all of this sounds good to you, don't wait for the movies.  Pick up the books by Collins and enjoy her version first.  They're a quick read, and this is a case where you have no reason to be ashamed to be seen with the books.  There's nothing guilty about the pleasures they offer, and I hope this is just the start for Collins as a storyteller, and that she's not done after this one story.

HG Stuff

Mar. 31st, 2011 12:52 pm
shipperx: (Aeryn - Girl With Gun)

From Screen Rant:

After Lawrence was confirmed as Katniss, speculation turned to who might be playing the role of Peeta Mellark – a fellow contestant in the titular games who’s been carrying a torch for Katniss for several years. Now, THR has revealed a list of up-and-coming young actors that the studio is considering for the role. They also have a rundown of who’s being eyed for the part of Gale Hawthorne – Katniss’ good friend and hunting partner.

As far as Peeta is concerned, it looks like a few names that have popped up in the past are still in the running – specifically, Josh Hutcherson and Hunter Parrish.

The list also includes Alexander Ludwig, Lucas Till, and Evan Peters.

Interestingly, it looks like Alex Pettyfer (I Am Number Four) is no longer in consideration.

For the part of Gale, THR claims that the studio’s list includes names like Liam Hemsworth, David Henrie, Robbie Amell, and Drew Roy.



All You Need To Know About 'The Hunger Games'
from Cheat Sheet:

 

If you've never read the books, you might be wondering why fans are so rabid about this series of books, why they're so invested in the casting of the lead, and what you might be expecting to see in theaters in 2012.  That's why we've decided to make "Hunger Games" the first entry in our Cheat Sheet series, and hopefully by the end of this article, you'll be able to observe the rest of the casting and the crazy hype with an expert's eye.

And who knows?  Maybe a few of you will even be motivated to pick up the novels by Suzanne Collins as a result.

I did not follow along as the books were being published.  I picked up a bundle of all three novels, Hunger Games, Catching Fire, and Mockingjay, at Costco one afternoon for something like $25.  By that point, Gary Ross was already attached to direct the films based on a screenplay by Billy Ray, and so I cracked open the first book with a sense of obligation.  After all, many of these kid-lit fads are genuinely awful books that catch on because of whichever potent wish-fulfillment fantasy they tap instead of any actual merit or quality in the writing.

That is not the case with these books.  Suzanne Collins is a talented writer with a great sense of both character and pace.  She has created an interesting world, one that exists largely on the allegorical level, and she has peopled it with characters that are easy to like and that are recognizably human.  The books grapple with ideas about society, relationships, and personal responsibility, but they do so without ever sacrificing the fundamental value of a good yarn well-told.  Taken as a whole, I think it's a great read, playing with some pretty familiar archetypes and ideas in a way that makes it feel fresh and urgent and, yes, personal.
 
The dystopian nation of Panem:
Read more... )
The Districts:
Read more... )
Katniss Everdeen:
Read more... )
Peeta Mellark:
Read more... )

That's the hardest part about the first book's set-up, emotionally.  These kids walk in knowing that 23 of them will die, no matter what.  That's what the Hunger Games are, and what they've always been.  So even the tributes from the 12 different Districts can't really rely on one another, since they know they can't both survive.  They are not players.  They are not contestants.  They are resigned to death walking in the door.  They are, indeed, tributes.

There's an added element to the way the reaping works that is fairly grim.  It involves the tesserae each family receives each year.  That's a government-controlled allotment of grain and oil, and it's very small, barely enough for one person.  The only way to get an additional tesserae is to put your name in the reaping an extra time, and you can do as many as one per family member for your whole family.  It increases your chances of getting picked, of course, but it also keeps your family alive.  And each year, you put that many more in again, with all the old ones still in there, so someone could have dozens of entries with their name on it in the reaping by the time they finally turn 18.  The name of the Hunger Games is both appropriate and also a blatant insult to all those forced to participate in it.

The 'Reward' (Other than post-traumatic stress):
Read more... )
Haymitch:
Read more... )The bad guy, President Snow:Read more... )
Let the games begin...
Read more... )
Gale Hawthorne:
Read more... )

The Sequels "Catching Fire" and "Mockingjay":
Read more... )

Katniss Everdeen is a complicated character, and she makes bad decisions sometimes, but she is always painted as someone who is at heart decent, and who genuinely wants to do the right thing.  The role is a gift for Lawrence, and  "Winter's Bone" could not have been a more perfect audition for this film.  She feels like a very real member of that community in that film, and there is a hard adulthood that seems at odd with the soft, young quality of her face.  Lawrence  carries sadness and coiled wariness with her at all times in that film, and it seems like she'll have to draw on a lot of the same qualities when she plays Katniss.

In finding her, they can now cast Peeta and Gale around her, so they are the right ages, and they can also find a Haymitch who has a rapport with her.  It's not a huge cast, considering the scope of the story they're telling, but there are a lot of supporting characters who come and go, and so my guess is there will be a lot of guest appearances, familiar faces in smaller roles, designed to fill the world out without breaking the bank.

This is a big gamble for Lionsgate, but a good one.  They've got great source material, a finite story to tell, and they're treating it like a prestige movie. 

Short of revealing every plot twist, that's pretty much all you need to know to jump into a "Hunger Games" conversation with authority.  You can grumble now along with the hardcore fans about how they need to cast Hugh Laurie for Haymitch, and you can pick a side in the Peeta/Gale debate, knowing full well that either side could be right.  And if all of this sounds good to you, don't wait for the movies.  Pick up the books by Collins and enjoy her version first.  They're a quick read, and this is a case where you have no reason to be ashamed to be seen with the books.  There's nothing guilty about the pleasures they offer, and I hope this is just the start for Collins as a storyteller, and that she's not done after this one story.

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