shipperx: (Hunger Games - Mockingjay)
Self Important Nitwit
Joel Stein: The only thing more embarrassing than catching a guy on the plane looking at pornography on his computer is seeing a guy on the plane reading “The Hunger Games.” {...} Or Harry Potter. The only time I’m O.K. with an adult holding a children’s book is if he’s moving his mouth as he reads.

I’m sure all those books are well written. So is “Horton Hatches the Egg.” But Horton doesn’t have the depth of language and character as literature written for people who have stopped physically growing.

I appreciate that adults occasionally watch Pixar movies or play video games. That’s fine. Those media don’t require much of your brains. Books are one of our few chances to learn. There’s a reason my teachers didn’t assign me to go home and play three hours of Donkey Kong.

I have no idea what “The Hunger Games” is like. Maybe there are complicated shades of good and evil in each character. Maybe there are Pynchonesque turns of phrase. Maybe it delves into issues of identity, self-justification and anomie that would make David Foster Wallace proud. I don’t know because it’s a book for kids. I’ll read “The Hunger Games” when I finish the previous 3,000 years of fiction written for adults.


Star Trek 2
Read more... )

Dr Who


Read more... )

True Blood

HBO has set an official season five premiere date for June 10


Game of Thrones:
Cersei:


Read more... )

Sansa:


Read more... )
shipperx: (Hunger Games - Mockingjay)
Self Important Nitwit
Joel Stein: The only thing more embarrassing than catching a guy on the plane looking at pornography on his computer is seeing a guy on the plane reading “The Hunger Games.” {...} Or Harry Potter. The only time I’m O.K. with an adult holding a children’s book is if he’s moving his mouth as he reads.

I’m sure all those books are well written. So is “Horton Hatches the Egg.” But Horton doesn’t have the depth of language and character as literature written for people who have stopped physically growing.

I appreciate that adults occasionally watch Pixar movies or play video games. That’s fine. Those media don’t require much of your brains. Books are one of our few chances to learn. There’s a reason my teachers didn’t assign me to go home and play three hours of Donkey Kong.

I have no idea what “The Hunger Games” is like. Maybe there are complicated shades of good and evil in each character. Maybe there are Pynchonesque turns of phrase. Maybe it delves into issues of identity, self-justification and anomie that would make David Foster Wallace proud. I don’t know because it’s a book for kids. I’ll read “The Hunger Games” when I finish the previous 3,000 years of fiction written for adults.


Star Trek 2
Read more... )

Dr Who


Read more... )

True Blood

HBO has set an official season five premiere date for June 10


Game of Thrones:
Cersei:


Read more... )

Sansa:


Read more... )
shipperx: (Hunger Games - Mockingjay)
Self Important Nitwit
Joel Stein: The only thing more embarrassing than catching a guy on the plane looking at pornography on his computer is seeing a guy on the plane reading “The Hunger Games.” {...} Or Harry Potter. The only time I’m O.K. with an adult holding a children’s book is if he’s moving his mouth as he reads.

I’m sure all those books are well written. So is “Horton Hatches the Egg.” But Horton doesn’t have the depth of language and character as literature written for people who have stopped physically growing.

I appreciate that adults occasionally watch Pixar movies or play video games. That’s fine. Those media don’t require much of your brains. Books are one of our few chances to learn. There’s a reason my teachers didn’t assign me to go home and play three hours of Donkey Kong.

I have no idea what “The Hunger Games” is like. Maybe there are complicated shades of good and evil in each character. Maybe there are Pynchonesque turns of phrase. Maybe it delves into issues of identity, self-justification and anomie that would make David Foster Wallace proud. I don’t know because it’s a book for kids. I’ll read “The Hunger Games” when I finish the previous 3,000 years of fiction written for adults.


Star Trek 2
Read more... )

Dr Who


Read more... )

True Blood

HBO has set an official season five premiere date for June 10


Game of Thrones:
Cersei:


Read more... )

Sansa:


Read more... )
shipperx: (Kirk - I meant to do that)
From EW.com:

Trek’s humble origins are almost hard to believe. When TV producer Gene Roddenberry pitched his “Wagon Train to the Stars” to NBC, it had already been rejected by CBS in favor of Lost in Space. Then, even after the Peacock finally did pick it up, they dismissed the pilot, starring Jeffrey Hunter as Captain Christopher Pike of the USS Enterprise, as “too cerebral,” and demanded a re-shoot. Only Leonard Nimoy as Mr. Spock survived the cast change for a new pilot built around a hammy Canadian named William Shatner, who, so far, had only scrounged together a career out of bit parts in movies like Judgment at Nuremberg and a couple very memorable Twilight Zone appearances.

Needless to say, expectations for Star Trek were low. And though it did face cancellation after just three seasons, it’s become one of our most venerable franchises, having spawned five subsequent series and eleven movies. Much of what has followed since has been so good, in fact, that it’s almost easy to write off the original series as mere camp: heavy-handed messages conveyed through overripe performances amid garish papier-mâché sets. Those who do just that, do so at their own peril. The original series’ budget-limitations actually spurred creativity, such as when the Romulans were revealed to be the evil cousins of our lovable, logical Vulcans. Sure, they were only related because Trek’s production company Desilu (yes, that Desilu) couldn’t afford to come up with original makeup for another alien race. But how much more interesting that became as storytelling! The Vulcans, those most stalwart founding members of the United Federation of Planets, were now looked upon with suspicion by Starfleet’s more xenophobic humans and forced to ask themselves whether their embrace of pure logic is indeed meaningful or just a fragile lie meant to conceal their true passions. If Star Trek had been given a greater budget, it would have looked more polished, to be sure, but would that kind of guerrilla, seat-of-the-pants storytelling impulse have survived?

From the perspective of 2011, you could even say that the three year run of Star Trek, with its small but fervently devoted audience, anticipated today’s niche entertainment. And there’s even more to celebrate, now that J.J. Abrams is officially signed to direct the next movie installment. So, to honor 45 years of going where no man has gone before, EW presents you with reasons to continue loving all things Trek.

* Sulu’s mad fencing skills

* Tribbles

* Clint Howard as Balok

* Spock undergoing pon farr

* God-like non-corporeal aliens passing judgment on us all.

“ Damn it, Jim, I’m a doctor, not a [insert non sequitur here]”

* Kirk’s familiarity with the complete works of Jacqueline Susann and aversion to punk rock.

* Mirror Universe Spock’s goatee and Mirror Universe Uhura’s uniform (could that really have been regulation, even in the Terran Empire?)

* Random planets that based their cultures on ancient Greece, ancient Rome, Nazi Germany, Native Americans, and 1920s Chicago

* Transporter accidents

* Deus ex deflector array

* Green space babes

* Ricardo Montalban’s pecs

* Aliens who force crewmembers to take part in mortal combat

* Joan Collins as noble-hearted 1930s missionary (and unwitting Nazi abettor) Edith Keeler

* The Greek gods! They’re real, though they’re interstellar travelers with self-esteem and abandonment issues.

* Episode titles like “For the World is Hollow and I Have Touched the Sky” and “Is There In Truth No Beauty?”

* Gene Roddenberry’s obsession with “empaths.”

* Giant space amoebas.

* The possibility that you could run afoul of hippies in interstellar space.

* The significant rate of Starfleet officers who develop god-like powers.

* Klingons of the 2260s. Though we never speak of their physical appearance. It was…a dark time.

* 20th century space probes that return to humanity super-intelligent, but with daddy issues.

* The notches on Capt. Kirk’s belt. Surely they number among the stars.

* Humanity’s ill-advised flirtation with the creation of genetically-engineered supermen.

* The Eugenics War of 1996, which was clearly covered up by the lamestream media.

* The literacy rate of the 23rd century judging by Kirk’s love of Dickens and Khan’s affinity for Melville.

* Radiation that causes rapid aging. (Also the MacGuffin that could enable an appearance from the Shat in the next Trek film. J.J. Abrams take note!)

* The possibility that, as a Starfleet officer, you may randomly find yourself forced to reenact the Gunfight at the O.K. Corral.

* That you can travel back in time by sling-shotting around the sun.

* Spock’s brain (and “Spock’s Brain”)

* KHAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAN!”

* Red Shirts.
shipperx: (Kirk - I meant to do that)
From EW.com:

Trek’s humble origins are almost hard to believe. When TV producer Gene Roddenberry pitched his “Wagon Train to the Stars” to NBC, it had already been rejected by CBS in favor of Lost in Space. Then, even after the Peacock finally did pick it up, they dismissed the pilot, starring Jeffrey Hunter as Captain Christopher Pike of the USS Enterprise, as “too cerebral,” and demanded a re-shoot. Only Leonard Nimoy as Mr. Spock survived the cast change for a new pilot built around a hammy Canadian named William Shatner, who, so far, had only scrounged together a career out of bit parts in movies like Judgment at Nuremberg and a couple very memorable Twilight Zone appearances.

Needless to say, expectations for Star Trek were low. And though it did face cancellation after just three seasons, it’s become one of our most venerable franchises, having spawned five subsequent series and eleven movies. Much of what has followed since has been so good, in fact, that it’s almost easy to write off the original series as mere camp: heavy-handed messages conveyed through overripe performances amid garish papier-mâché sets. Those who do just that, do so at their own peril. The original series’ budget-limitations actually spurred creativity, such as when the Romulans were revealed to be the evil cousins of our lovable, logical Vulcans. Sure, they were only related because Trek’s production company Desilu (yes, that Desilu) couldn’t afford to come up with original makeup for another alien race. But how much more interesting that became as storytelling! The Vulcans, those most stalwart founding members of the United Federation of Planets, were now looked upon with suspicion by Starfleet’s more xenophobic humans and forced to ask themselves whether their embrace of pure logic is indeed meaningful or just a fragile lie meant to conceal their true passions. If Star Trek had been given a greater budget, it would have looked more polished, to be sure, but would that kind of guerrilla, seat-of-the-pants storytelling impulse have survived?

From the perspective of 2011, you could even say that the three year run of Star Trek, with its small but fervently devoted audience, anticipated today’s niche entertainment. And there’s even more to celebrate, now that J.J. Abrams is officially signed to direct the next movie installment. So, to honor 45 years of going where no man has gone before, EW presents you with reasons to continue loving all things Trek.

* Sulu’s mad fencing skills

* Tribbles

* Clint Howard as Balok

* Spock undergoing pon farr

* God-like non-corporeal aliens passing judgment on us all.

“ Damn it, Jim, I’m a doctor, not a [insert non sequitur here]”

* Kirk’s familiarity with the complete works of Jacqueline Susann and aversion to punk rock.

* Mirror Universe Spock’s goatee and Mirror Universe Uhura’s uniform (could that really have been regulation, even in the Terran Empire?)

* Random planets that based their cultures on ancient Greece, ancient Rome, Nazi Germany, Native Americans, and 1920s Chicago

* Transporter accidents

* Deus ex deflector array

* Green space babes

* Ricardo Montalban’s pecs

* Aliens who force crewmembers to take part in mortal combat

* Joan Collins as noble-hearted 1930s missionary (and unwitting Nazi abettor) Edith Keeler

* The Greek gods! They’re real, though they’re interstellar travelers with self-esteem and abandonment issues.

* Episode titles like “For the World is Hollow and I Have Touched the Sky” and “Is There In Truth No Beauty?”

* Gene Roddenberry’s obsession with “empaths.”

* Giant space amoebas.

* The possibility that you could run afoul of hippies in interstellar space.

* The significant rate of Starfleet officers who develop god-like powers.

* Klingons of the 2260s. Though we never speak of their physical appearance. It was…a dark time.

* 20th century space probes that return to humanity super-intelligent, but with daddy issues.

* The notches on Capt. Kirk’s belt. Surely they number among the stars.

* Humanity’s ill-advised flirtation with the creation of genetically-engineered supermen.

* The Eugenics War of 1996, which was clearly covered up by the lamestream media.

* The literacy rate of the 23rd century judging by Kirk’s love of Dickens and Khan’s affinity for Melville.

* Radiation that causes rapid aging. (Also the MacGuffin that could enable an appearance from the Shat in the next Trek film. J.J. Abrams take note!)

* The possibility that, as a Starfleet officer, you may randomly find yourself forced to reenact the Gunfight at the O.K. Corral.

* That you can travel back in time by sling-shotting around the sun.

* Spock’s brain (and “Spock’s Brain”)

* KHAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAN!”

* Red Shirts.
shipperx: (Kirk - I meant to do that)
From EW.com:

Trek’s humble origins are almost hard to believe. When TV producer Gene Roddenberry pitched his “Wagon Train to the Stars” to NBC, it had already been rejected by CBS in favor of Lost in Space. Then, even after the Peacock finally did pick it up, they dismissed the pilot, starring Jeffrey Hunter as Captain Christopher Pike of the USS Enterprise, as “too cerebral,” and demanded a re-shoot. Only Leonard Nimoy as Mr. Spock survived the cast change for a new pilot built around a hammy Canadian named William Shatner, who, so far, had only scrounged together a career out of bit parts in movies like Judgment at Nuremberg and a couple very memorable Twilight Zone appearances.

Needless to say, expectations for Star Trek were low. And though it did face cancellation after just three seasons, it’s become one of our most venerable franchises, having spawned five subsequent series and eleven movies. Much of what has followed since has been so good, in fact, that it’s almost easy to write off the original series as mere camp: heavy-handed messages conveyed through overripe performances amid garish papier-mâché sets. Those who do just that, do so at their own peril. The original series’ budget-limitations actually spurred creativity, such as when the Romulans were revealed to be the evil cousins of our lovable, logical Vulcans. Sure, they were only related because Trek’s production company Desilu (yes, that Desilu) couldn’t afford to come up with original makeup for another alien race. But how much more interesting that became as storytelling! The Vulcans, those most stalwart founding members of the United Federation of Planets, were now looked upon with suspicion by Starfleet’s more xenophobic humans and forced to ask themselves whether their embrace of pure logic is indeed meaningful or just a fragile lie meant to conceal their true passions. If Star Trek had been given a greater budget, it would have looked more polished, to be sure, but would that kind of guerrilla, seat-of-the-pants storytelling impulse have survived?

From the perspective of 2011, you could even say that the three year run of Star Trek, with its small but fervently devoted audience, anticipated today’s niche entertainment. And there’s even more to celebrate, now that J.J. Abrams is officially signed to direct the next movie installment. So, to honor 45 years of going where no man has gone before, EW presents you with reasons to continue loving all things Trek.

* Sulu’s mad fencing skills

* Tribbles

* Clint Howard as Balok

* Spock undergoing pon farr

* God-like non-corporeal aliens passing judgment on us all.

“ Damn it, Jim, I’m a doctor, not a [insert non sequitur here]”

* Kirk’s familiarity with the complete works of Jacqueline Susann and aversion to punk rock.

* Mirror Universe Spock’s goatee and Mirror Universe Uhura’s uniform (could that really have been regulation, even in the Terran Empire?)

* Random planets that based their cultures on ancient Greece, ancient Rome, Nazi Germany, Native Americans, and 1920s Chicago

* Transporter accidents

* Deus ex deflector array

* Green space babes

* Ricardo Montalban’s pecs

* Aliens who force crewmembers to take part in mortal combat

* Joan Collins as noble-hearted 1930s missionary (and unwitting Nazi abettor) Edith Keeler

* The Greek gods! They’re real, though they’re interstellar travelers with self-esteem and abandonment issues.

* Episode titles like “For the World is Hollow and I Have Touched the Sky” and “Is There In Truth No Beauty?”

* Gene Roddenberry’s obsession with “empaths.”

* Giant space amoebas.

* The possibility that you could run afoul of hippies in interstellar space.

* The significant rate of Starfleet officers who develop god-like powers.

* Klingons of the 2260s. Though we never speak of their physical appearance. It was…a dark time.

* 20th century space probes that return to humanity super-intelligent, but with daddy issues.

* The notches on Capt. Kirk’s belt. Surely they number among the stars.

* Humanity’s ill-advised flirtation with the creation of genetically-engineered supermen.

* The Eugenics War of 1996, which was clearly covered up by the lamestream media.

* The literacy rate of the 23rd century judging by Kirk’s love of Dickens and Khan’s affinity for Melville.

* Radiation that causes rapid aging. (Also the MacGuffin that could enable an appearance from the Shat in the next Trek film. J.J. Abrams take note!)

* The possibility that, as a Starfleet officer, you may randomly find yourself forced to reenact the Gunfight at the O.K. Corral.

* That you can travel back in time by sling-shotting around the sun.

* Spock’s brain (and “Spock’s Brain”)

* KHAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAN!”

* Red Shirts.
shipperx: (Star Trek: Spock/Uhura)
It's not often (okay almost never) that an article on sci-fi actually makes you feel something, but this article about Nichelle Nichols (Star Trek, Uhura) meeting Dr. Martin Luther King. (link gakked from [livejournal.com profile] killerweasel ).
shipperx: (Star Trek: Spock/Uhura)
It's not often (okay almost never) that an article on sci-fi actually makes you feel something, but this article about Nichelle Nichols (Star Trek, Uhura) meeting Dr. Martin Luther King. (link gakked from [livejournal.com profile] killerweasel ).
shipperx: (Star Trek: Spock/Uhura)
It's not often (okay almost never) that an article on sci-fi actually makes you feel something, but this article about Nichelle Nichols (Star Trek, Uhura) meeting Dr. Martin Luther King. (link gakked from [livejournal.com profile] killerweasel ).

Star Trek

May. 17th, 2009 11:52 pm
shipperx: (Kirk - I meant to do that)
That was fun.

I finally got a chance to see the new Trek movie and I think they did a good job. I grew up watching TOS in reruns and seeing TNG in first run, so Trek has a nostalgic pull for me. I think they did what they needed to do. In the end I think it boils down to this: these are characters we've loved and what we want from a remake is to love them again. Star Trek achieved that. More spoilery talk behind the cut... )

Below the cut, I've mentioned fanfic. Even before I saw the movie I had thought that the Star Trek-verse is really a huge playground for fanficcers. On audible I had listened recently to some lectures on science fiction and fantasy fiction and the professor doing the lectures is very big on world-building and on whether or not the 'world' that is built feels organic. Much of the Trek verse is organic because it was developed over such a long period of time by so many people. For all of the Trekkie attention to detail, Trek really isn't a complicated mythos. It's an expansive one. There are many cultures with...well... their own culture, but most of which are quite human (even if they are alien), and any of which could have a 'good' representative or a 'bad' one, because Trek usually welcomes that sort of complexity. Read more... )

Star Trek

May. 17th, 2009 11:52 pm
shipperx: (Kirk - I meant to do that)
That was fun.

I finally got a chance to see the new Trek movie and I think they did a good job. I grew up watching TOS in reruns and seeing TNG in first run, so Trek has a nostalgic pull for me. I think they did what they needed to do. In the end I think it boils down to this: these are characters we've loved and what we want from a remake is to love them again. Star Trek achieved that. More spoilery talk behind the cut... )

Below the cut, I've mentioned fanfic. Even before I saw the movie I had thought that the Star Trek-verse is really a huge playground for fanficcers. On audible I had listened recently to some lectures on science fiction and fantasy fiction and the professor doing the lectures is very big on world-building and on whether or not the 'world' that is built feels organic. Much of the Trek verse is organic because it was developed over such a long period of time by so many people. For all of the Trekkie attention to detail, Trek really isn't a complicated mythos. It's an expansive one. There are many cultures with...well... their own culture, but most of which are quite human (even if they are alien), and any of which could have a 'good' representative or a 'bad' one, because Trek usually welcomes that sort of complexity. Read more... )

Star Trek

May. 17th, 2009 11:52 pm
shipperx: (Kirk - I meant to do that)
That was fun.

I finally got a chance to see the new Trek movie and I think they did a good job. I grew up watching TOS in reruns and seeing TNG in first run, so Trek has a nostalgic pull for me. I think they did what they needed to do. In the end I think it boils down to this: these are characters we've loved and what we want from a remake is to love them again. Star Trek achieved that. More spoilery talk behind the cut... )

Below the cut, I've mentioned fanfic. Even before I saw the movie I had thought that the Star Trek-verse is really a huge playground for fanficcers. On audible I had listened recently to some lectures on science fiction and fantasy fiction and the professor doing the lectures is very big on world-building and on whether or not the 'world' that is built feels organic. Much of the Trek verse is organic because it was developed over such a long period of time by so many people. For all of the Trekkie attention to detail, Trek really isn't a complicated mythos. It's an expansive one. There are many cultures with...well... their own culture, but most of which are quite human (even if they are alien), and any of which could have a 'good' representative or a 'bad' one, because Trek usually welcomes that sort of complexity. Read more... )

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