shipperx: (Scully - What a doof)
Two days late, but still... WTH?  How has this much time passed?

From the Houston Chronicle:

'The X-Files' is 20 years old, and now you feel ancient

Twenty years ao on this date, the long-running Fox sci-fi series The X-Files premiered. Debuting on Sept. 10, 1993, the show would see a gradual rise in popularity, transitioning from cult joy to bona fide pop-culture hit. There were magazine covers, books, fan sites on an infant Internet, all culminating in 1998's big-screen event.

Through The X-Files, David Duchovny and Gillian Anderson became sex symbols, and the show's plots about conspiracy theories, alien intruders, and paranormal phenomena made it must-see TV.

Plenty of shows tried to replicate the magic, but they mostly failed. Remember NBC's Dark Skies?

Breaking Bad creator Vince Gilligan cut his teeth on The X-Files, writing and producing dozens of episodes. You can see more than a glimmer of the Fox show in the misadventures of Walter White and the gang too. All the major players on Breaking Bad also had small turns on The X-Files, including Bryan Cranston, Aaron Paul, and Dean Norris.





X-Files was a HUGE fannish thing for me. It was probably where I first began reading fanfic. It's still the fandom where I wrote most of my fanfic and the one where I wrote my longest fanfic.

"Shipper" was a new thing and I remember the constant - CONSTANT -- "Shipper"/"Noromo" wars (Noromo = no romance). Arguments over what exactly the realtionship between Mulder and Scully was and what it should be.

And Scully?

She still kicks major ass as a heroine.

Seriously, to this day I believe she tops most show heroines. She was a smart. She was educated. She was COMPETENT (which shouldn't be so rare, but totally is). She could confront authority. She could question. She could think or be skeptical. She could believe. She could take care of herself (and usually rescued herself) and she could rescue Mulder too when necessary. The woman had nerves of steel, never freaking out when I would've done so a thousand times. She was never prone to melodrama or histrionics, but underneath was a strong, loyal, determined heart.


Scully rocks and always will.



And I'll always love the competitive, squabbling equals who would walk through hell for each other that was the Mulder/Scully ship.


Oh yeah, they were awesome. :)

(And a tiny bit of my heart still slashes Skinner/Doggett just a little bit. :)

14

Aug. 28th, 2012 10:52 am
shipperx: (Scully - What a doof)
So I'm reading Peter Cline's 14

Amazon blurb:
There are some odd things about Nate’s new apartment.

Of course, he has other things on his mind. He hates his job. He has no money in the bank. No girlfriend. No plans for the future. So while his new home isn’t perfect, it’s livable. The rent is low, the property managers are friendly, and the odd little mysteries don’t nag at him too much. At least, not until he meets Mandy, his neighbor across the hall, and notices something unusual about her apartment. And Xela’s apartment. And Tim’s. And Veek’s.

Because every room in this old Los Angeles brownstone has a mystery or two. Mysteries that stretch back over a hundred years. Some of them are in plain sight. Some are behind locked doors. And all together these mysteries could mean the end of Nate and his friends.

Or the end of everything...

The blurb for the book made me think it would be a haunted apartment building story -- and it may yet be -- but as I'm reading it, it's making me think... I don't know... aliens?  Either that, or the place is owned by Wolfram and Hart...

Huh.

Guess I'll see. (Mulder and Scully really should be included, though.  This sort of thing was right up their alley. ;)

ETA (Not Quite Half Way Through):  It's not coming off like a haunted house story.  It actually reminds me of LOST.  Several characters of different ages and types living in the building, all of whom are coming off as likable losers (part of the allure of the apartment building is the incredibly low rent) and all of whom are working together to figure out the weirdness. 

Thus far, it's been just weirdness.  Nothing scary,  just strange, mysterious, and odd. 


14

Aug. 28th, 2012 10:52 am
shipperx: (Scully - What a doof)
So I'm reading Peter Cline's 14

Amazon blurb:
There are some odd things about Nate’s new apartment.

Of course, he has other things on his mind. He hates his job. He has no money in the bank. No girlfriend. No plans for the future. So while his new home isn’t perfect, it’s livable. The rent is low, the property managers are friendly, and the odd little mysteries don’t nag at him too much. At least, not until he meets Mandy, his neighbor across the hall, and notices something unusual about her apartment. And Xela’s apartment. And Tim’s. And Veek’s.

Because every room in this old Los Angeles brownstone has a mystery or two. Mysteries that stretch back over a hundred years. Some of them are in plain sight. Some are behind locked doors. And all together these mysteries could mean the end of Nate and his friends.

Or the end of everything...

The blurb for the book made me think it would be a haunted apartment building story -- and it may yet be -- but as I'm reading it, it's making me think... I don't know... aliens?  Either that, or the place is owned by Wolfram and Hart...

Huh.

Guess I'll see. (Mulder and Scully really should be included, though.  This sort of thing was right up their alley. ;)

ETA (Not Quite Half Way Through):  It's not coming off like a haunted house story.  It actually reminds me of LOST.  Several characters of different ages and types living in the building, all of whom are coming off as likable losers (part of the allure of the apartment building is the incredibly low rent) and all of whom are working together to figure out the weirdness. 

Thus far, it's been just weirdness.  Nothing scary,  just strange, mysterious, and odd. 


shipperx: (Scully - What a doof)
A friend of mine sent a link to an article today where David Duchovny talks about their working on another X-Files movie script.

I was not pleased. I had seen an article about it the other day and had hoped that if I ignored it hard enough, it would go away. My reaction was to shake my head and go no, no, or for the love of-- NO! Please, Chris Carter, I'm begging. Let it go!

Look, I loved the X-Files. I was hard core. I watched every episode. I taped them. I went to after episode chats. I participated in the fandom. I wrote fanfic. I participated in Virtual Season 8 and Virtual Season 9. Joined Scully_fic. I saw both movies, bought DVDs, and read every tie in novel. Hell, I watched The Lone Gunman series (and Harsh Realm)... and I'm begging, PLEASE DON'T DO ANOTHER MOVIE! Let my beloved old fandom not be bastardized out of greed. M'kay?

I got a good ending (Requiem) and a less good ending (whatever was the name of the final episode of the tv series). I even got a movie that warmed over the old coals, but it did at least give some relationship stuff that I didn't hate (actually, CC never bastardized the relationship. He was good on that score). But... enough is enough. Mulder and Scully were wonderful. Now, leave them the hell alone!

Which is going to bring me to the subject of reboots. I'm not really going to discuss the Non-Joss/Non-TV Series "Buffy" reboot because I've said my fill about that elsewhere (gist: I don't see the point of a reboot when nothing from the TV series can be used. That effectively eliminates 99% of Buffy's origin story, most of the mythology, her sidekicks, her villains, and her love interests. Try rebooting Superman without Lex Luthor, Lois Lane, Lana Lang, The Daily Planet, the Fortress of Solitude, Smallville, or Metropolis. It's not so easy. Sure you've got a baby in an asteroid, but what else that's recognizable?) Instead I was thinking about reboots that worked and perhaps why they worked.

The Battlestar Gallactica reboot worked. I'm mumbledy-mumble years old, and I was a fan of the original BSG... when I was in first or second grade! (I remember us playing BSG on the monkey bars after the regular argument over who could be Athena... as she was the only female pilot on the show.) Let's examine that for a moment. I'm probably in the youngest age bracket of folks who could remember the original series and I'm on the upper end of the target demographic. I could barely remember the original series and my memory amounted to basically "Cylons destroyed the planets, there was a lot of Greek stuff, Starbuck was cute, and they were in search of Earth". Anyone younger than myself wouldn't remember the series at all. Anyone more than a few years older than myself probably didn't watch, because the original was a kid's show. This allowed the reboot to adopt the basic outline from the original but not a whole heck of a lot else. It wasn't necessary. The elementary schoolers that watched the original were all well into adulthood with barely any memories of the original beyond the big stuff (cylons! Destroyed planets! Greek names. Starbuck and Apollo.) Even then, they kept many of the basics. Adama was the Admiral. Apollo was Adama's 'good guy' son. Starbuck was a snarky, cynical bad-ass who smoked cigars and played poker (even if in the original Starbuck was a guy, the characteristics were true to the original Starbuck... just now on a female rather than a male... and there was a great deal of wank about that fact when it was first announced. But, remembering the playground days when we had to argue over who could 'be' Athena, I was pleased that there would be more than one female pilot now). Oh, and Baltar was kind of crazy and in cahoots with the Cylons.

So, the primary character basics from the original were there in a recognizable fashion in the reboot. Plus, as a pacifier to the hard core fen (which I gather actually existed), they offered one of the orignal leads, Richard Hatch, a featured role in the remake in the part of Zarek.

So basically, they had a 25+ year old franchise whose original audience had largely been in elementary school children that only remembered the bare outline of the series and who are adults rather than kids now anyway... and the original fairly cool premise with a handfull of characters being used in roughly the same way as they were in the orignal (at least through the mini-series). That gave a lot of lattitude for reboot. Although, most of the differences from the original to the miniseries weren't in story so much as in execution.

The story of the reboot miniseries -- the planets were destroyed, Adama had the only remaining Battlestar, (the other remaining Battlestar showing up later in both series), Baltar as the sell-out to the Cylons, Apollo and Starbuck as the featured favorite fighter pilots on the front lines, and the ultimate, scary decision to try to find the lost colony -- Earth ... was all the same, just instead of pure cheese it was given a far more gritty, adult treatment. It basically took the original concept and characters, gave it an update and superior writing, and added just a couple of twists (there was no Roslin in the original. Boomer was a guy and Athena was just a female pilot and not a cylon, cylons were easily spotted what with their being metal and all). It was both recognizable (to folks who only barely remembered the first with affection from their childhoods) and better. Because of that, it was a reboot that worked.

The other reboot that worked is the recent Trek reboot. Yes, the reboot is spiffy. And it had the JJ Abrams cult cred as he's a sci-fi guru in his own right. Gene Roddenberry couldn't be offended as he died several years ago. Majel Barret, his widow, gave the reboot her go-ahead before she died. The original cast are now far beyond their sci-fi action hero stages (and a few of them have passed away), and even then the reboot still called Leonard Nimoy back into active duty and gave him a significant role... his original role. He was still Spock.

And it's hard to miss that the Trek reboot delivered a significant dose of nostalgia in a fun way. It gave the bang and glitz and hotties for a new generation, while delighting fans by giving us the relationships and the notes we loved. I remember cracking up at the away mission when it was Kirk, Sulu... and a Red Shirt. And of course the red shirt immediately died! Loved that. People in the audience got the shout-out, were in on the joke, and enjoyed that nod to Trek history. People enjoyed the heck out of Sulu announcing that he could fence, then his kicking ass fencing. Keith Urban's Bones characterization was one big ol' hommage to DeForest Kelly. It was a treat. That was McCoy almost exactly as we knew him... only younger and hotter. But, still, it was recognizably him. And Scottie! Uhura! Chekov! Even Pike! (in a wheelchair no less). And of course, we finally got to see Kirk sabotage the Kobayashi Maru. (Spock losing his shit over it was a bonus!)

So much of the Trek Reboot was simply about re-introducing us to the old characters we loved in younger form, and then showing us that these were still the characters we loved. And the relationships we loved. They didn't skimp on the Kirk/Spock (or the Kirk/McCoy). If you're going to do TOS Trek, you have to honor those relationships. It wasn't just that Kirk was recognizably the same character. It wasn't that we had not one but two Spocks. It was that the friendship of Kirk/Spock was paramount. Hell, the friendship of the entire crew was paramount. The joy of the reboot was getting the old gang back together and proving to us, that despite the younger faces and bods... they were still the old gang. And we still got Spock, original version showing us why we loved the original version all along.

It was also pretty brilliant of Abrams that he allowed the original timeline to stand undisturbed, telling us -- quite literally -- this is an alternate timeline. The Trek Reboot worked because it used the relationships of the original and gave it its own different place... and made it fun. Somewhere in my LJ is my review of the Trek reboot when it came out and I remember saying something along the lines of it delivered what it had to -- it gave us the characters we loved and showed us why we loved them all over again.

I think most reboots that work tend to be ones that have enough age to them that there's nostalgia supporting them. Nostalgia (helpful if perhaps our memories have clouded with time) and the relationships and characters we love in the way that we love them.

Give me another fifteen years and I may be all for an X-Files reboot (still, please no continuation. The series had a 10+ year run. They exhausted the material.) But it really just hurt to watch the last X-Files movie because, though I could believe the way that things had changed in the story, that wasn't really the Mulder/Scully I loved. The Mulder/Scully I loved were bullheaded rogue FBI agents not people in a mid-life identity crisis having retired and wondering what to do with their lives.

I liked the way that the series ended -- yes, even the out-of-gas ending of the series finale, because it left Mulder and Scully fighting the good fight... together. That's what I wanted. That's the way I like to remember them -- so Chris Carter, quit screwing them up by bringing them back! Maybe in fifteen years I'll feel differently and someone can do a reboot and I'll squee, but for the time being, I like my originals just the way they were.

(And honestly, what's the point in rebooting the Kristie Swanson movie when it was the Fox and Mutant Enemy Buffy characters and stories that we loved? What's next, Harry Potter sans Ron, Hermione, Ginny, Voldemort, Snape, or Hogwarts and without the blessing of JK Rowling?)
shipperx: (Scully - What a doof)
A friend of mine sent a link to an article today where David Duchovny talks about their working on another X-Files movie script.

I was not pleased. I had seen an article about it the other day and had hoped that if I ignored it hard enough, it would go away. My reaction was to shake my head and go no, no, or for the love of-- NO! Please, Chris Carter, I'm begging. Let it go!

Look, I loved the X-Files. I was hard core. I watched every episode. I taped them. I went to after episode chats. I participated in the fandom. I wrote fanfic. I participated in Virtual Season 8 and Virtual Season 9. Joined Scully_fic. I saw both movies, bought DVDs, and read every tie in novel. Hell, I watched The Lone Gunman series (and Harsh Realm)... and I'm begging, PLEASE DON'T DO ANOTHER MOVIE! Let my beloved old fandom not be bastardized out of greed. M'kay?

I got a good ending (Requiem) and a less good ending (whatever was the name of the final episode of the tv series). I even got a movie that warmed over the old coals, but it did at least give some relationship stuff that I didn't hate (actually, CC never bastardized the relationship. He was good on that score). But... enough is enough. Mulder and Scully were wonderful. Now, leave them the hell alone!

Which is going to bring me to the subject of reboots. I'm not really going to discuss the Non-Joss/Non-TV Series "Buffy" reboot because I've said my fill about that elsewhere (gist: I don't see the point of a reboot when nothing from the TV series can be used. That effectively eliminates 99% of Buffy's origin story, most of the mythology, her sidekicks, her villains, and her love interests. Try rebooting Superman without Lex Luthor, Lois Lane, Lana Lang, The Daily Planet, the Fortress of Solitude, Smallville, or Metropolis. It's not so easy. Sure you've got a baby in an asteroid, but what else that's recognizable?) Instead I was thinking about reboots that worked and perhaps why they worked.

The Battlestar Gallactica reboot worked. I'm mumbledy-mumble years old, and I was a fan of the original BSG... when I was in first or second grade! (I remember us playing BSG on the monkey bars after the regular argument over who could be Athena... as she was the only female pilot on the show.) Let's examine that for a moment. I'm probably in the youngest age bracket of folks who could remember the original series and I'm on the upper end of the target demographic. I could barely remember the original series and my memory amounted to basically "Cylons destroyed the planets, there was a lot of Greek stuff, Starbuck was cute, and they were in search of Earth". Anyone younger than myself wouldn't remember the series at all. Anyone more than a few years older than myself probably didn't watch, because the original was a kid's show. This allowed the reboot to adopt the basic outline from the original but not a whole heck of a lot else. It wasn't necessary. The elementary schoolers that watched the original were all well into adulthood with barely any memories of the original beyond the big stuff (cylons! Destroyed planets! Greek names. Starbuck and Apollo.) Even then, they kept many of the basics. Adama was the Admiral. Apollo was Adama's 'good guy' son. Starbuck was a snarky, cynical bad-ass who smoked cigars and played poker (even if in the original Starbuck was a guy, the characteristics were true to the original Starbuck... just now on a female rather than a male... and there was a great deal of wank about that fact when it was first announced. But, remembering the playground days when we had to argue over who could 'be' Athena, I was pleased that there would be more than one female pilot now). Oh, and Baltar was kind of crazy and in cahoots with the Cylons.

So, the primary character basics from the original were there in a recognizable fashion in the reboot. Plus, as a pacifier to the hard core fen (which I gather actually existed), they offered one of the orignal leads, Richard Hatch, a featured role in the remake in the part of Zarek.

So basically, they had a 25+ year old franchise whose original audience had largely been in elementary school children that only remembered the bare outline of the series and who are adults rather than kids now anyway... and the original fairly cool premise with a handfull of characters being used in roughly the same way as they were in the orignal (at least through the mini-series). That gave a lot of lattitude for reboot. Although, most of the differences from the original to the miniseries weren't in story so much as in execution.

The story of the reboot miniseries -- the planets were destroyed, Adama had the only remaining Battlestar, (the other remaining Battlestar showing up later in both series), Baltar as the sell-out to the Cylons, Apollo and Starbuck as the featured favorite fighter pilots on the front lines, and the ultimate, scary decision to try to find the lost colony -- Earth ... was all the same, just instead of pure cheese it was given a far more gritty, adult treatment. It basically took the original concept and characters, gave it an update and superior writing, and added just a couple of twists (there was no Roslin in the original. Boomer was a guy and Athena was just a female pilot and not a cylon, cylons were easily spotted what with their being metal and all). It was both recognizable (to folks who only barely remembered the first with affection from their childhoods) and better. Because of that, it was a reboot that worked.

The other reboot that worked is the recent Trek reboot. Yes, the reboot is spiffy. And it had the JJ Abrams cult cred as he's a sci-fi guru in his own right. Gene Roddenberry couldn't be offended as he died several years ago. Majel Barret, his widow, gave the reboot her go-ahead before she died. The original cast are now far beyond their sci-fi action hero stages (and a few of them have passed away), and even then the reboot still called Leonard Nimoy back into active duty and gave him a significant role... his original role. He was still Spock.

And it's hard to miss that the Trek reboot delivered a significant dose of nostalgia in a fun way. It gave the bang and glitz and hotties for a new generation, while delighting fans by giving us the relationships and the notes we loved. I remember cracking up at the away mission when it was Kirk, Sulu... and a Red Shirt. And of course the red shirt immediately died! Loved that. People in the audience got the shout-out, were in on the joke, and enjoyed that nod to Trek history. People enjoyed the heck out of Sulu announcing that he could fence, then his kicking ass fencing. Keith Urban's Bones characterization was one big ol' hommage to DeForest Kelly. It was a treat. That was McCoy almost exactly as we knew him... only younger and hotter. But, still, it was recognizably him. And Scottie! Uhura! Chekov! Even Pike! (in a wheelchair no less). And of course, we finally got to see Kirk sabotage the Kobayashi Maru. (Spock losing his shit over it was a bonus!)

So much of the Trek Reboot was simply about re-introducing us to the old characters we loved in younger form, and then showing us that these were still the characters we loved. And the relationships we loved. They didn't skimp on the Kirk/Spock (or the Kirk/McCoy). If you're going to do TOS Trek, you have to honor those relationships. It wasn't just that Kirk was recognizably the same character. It wasn't that we had not one but two Spocks. It was that the friendship of Kirk/Spock was paramount. Hell, the friendship of the entire crew was paramount. The joy of the reboot was getting the old gang back together and proving to us, that despite the younger faces and bods... they were still the old gang. And we still got Spock, original version showing us why we loved the original version all along.

It was also pretty brilliant of Abrams that he allowed the original timeline to stand undisturbed, telling us -- quite literally -- this is an alternate timeline. The Trek Reboot worked because it used the relationships of the original and gave it its own different place... and made it fun. Somewhere in my LJ is my review of the Trek reboot when it came out and I remember saying something along the lines of it delivered what it had to -- it gave us the characters we loved and showed us why we loved them all over again.

I think most reboots that work tend to be ones that have enough age to them that there's nostalgia supporting them. Nostalgia (helpful if perhaps our memories have clouded with time) and the relationships and characters we love in the way that we love them.

Give me another fifteen years and I may be all for an X-Files reboot (still, please no continuation. The series had a 10+ year run. They exhausted the material.) But it really just hurt to watch the last X-Files movie because, though I could believe the way that things had changed in the story, that wasn't really the Mulder/Scully I loved. The Mulder/Scully I loved were bullheaded rogue FBI agents not people in a mid-life identity crisis having retired and wondering what to do with their lives.

I liked the way that the series ended -- yes, even the out-of-gas ending of the series finale, because it left Mulder and Scully fighting the good fight... together. That's what I wanted. That's the way I like to remember them -- so Chris Carter, quit screwing them up by bringing them back! Maybe in fifteen years I'll feel differently and someone can do a reboot and I'll squee, but for the time being, I like my originals just the way they were.

(And honestly, what's the point in rebooting the Kristie Swanson movie when it was the Fox and Mutant Enemy Buffy characters and stories that we loved? What's next, Harry Potter sans Ron, Hermione, Ginny, Voldemort, Snape, or Hogwarts and without the blessing of JK Rowling?)
shipperx: (Scully - What a doof)
A friend of mine sent a link to an article today where David Duchovny talks about their working on another X-Files movie script.

I was not pleased. I had seen an article about it the other day and had hoped that if I ignored it hard enough, it would go away. My reaction was to shake my head and go no, no, or for the love of-- NO! Please, Chris Carter, I'm begging. Let it go!

Look, I loved the X-Files. I was hard core. I watched every episode. I taped them. I went to after episode chats. I participated in the fandom. I wrote fanfic. I participated in Virtual Season 8 and Virtual Season 9. Joined Scully_fic. I saw both movies, bought DVDs, and read every tie in novel. Hell, I watched The Lone Gunman series (and Harsh Realm)... and I'm begging, PLEASE DON'T DO ANOTHER MOVIE! Let my beloved old fandom not be bastardized out of greed. M'kay?

I got a good ending (Requiem) and a less good ending (whatever was the name of the final episode of the tv series). I even got a movie that warmed over the old coals, but it did at least give some relationship stuff that I didn't hate (actually, CC never bastardized the relationship. He was good on that score). But... enough is enough. Mulder and Scully were wonderful. Now, leave them the hell alone!

Which is going to bring me to the subject of reboots. I'm not really going to discuss the Non-Joss/Non-TV Series "Buffy" reboot because I've said my fill about that elsewhere (gist: I don't see the point of a reboot when nothing from the TV series can be used. That effectively eliminates 99% of Buffy's origin story, most of the mythology, her sidekicks, her villains, and her love interests. Try rebooting Superman without Lex Luthor, Lois Lane, Lana Lang, The Daily Planet, the Fortress of Solitude, Smallville, or Metropolis. It's not so easy. Sure you've got a baby in an asteroid, but what else that's recognizable?) Instead I was thinking about reboots that worked and perhaps why they worked.

The Battlestar Gallactica reboot worked. I'm mumbledy-mumble years old, and I was a fan of the original BSG... when I was in first or second grade! (I remember us playing BSG on the monkey bars after the regular argument over who could be Athena... as she was the only female pilot on the show.) Let's examine that for a moment. I'm probably in the youngest age bracket of folks who could remember the original series and I'm on the upper end of the target demographic. I could barely remember the original series and my memory amounted to basically "Cylons destroyed the planets, there was a lot of Greek stuff, Starbuck was cute, and they were in search of Earth". Anyone younger than myself wouldn't remember the series at all. Anyone more than a few years older than myself probably didn't watch, because the original was a kid's show. This allowed the reboot to adopt the basic outline from the original but not a whole heck of a lot else. It wasn't necessary. The elementary schoolers that watched the original were all well into adulthood with barely any memories of the original beyond the big stuff (cylons! Destroyed planets! Greek names. Starbuck and Apollo.) Even then, they kept many of the basics. Adama was the Admiral. Apollo was Adama's 'good guy' son. Starbuck was a snarky, cynical bad-ass who smoked cigars and played poker (even if in the original Starbuck was a guy, the characteristics were true to the original Starbuck... just now on a female rather than a male... and there was a great deal of wank about that fact when it was first announced. But, remembering the playground days when we had to argue over who could 'be' Athena, I was pleased that there would be more than one female pilot now). Oh, and Baltar was kind of crazy and in cahoots with the Cylons.

So, the primary character basics from the original were there in a recognizable fashion in the reboot. Plus, as a pacifier to the hard core fen (which I gather actually existed), they offered one of the orignal leads, Richard Hatch, a featured role in the remake in the part of Zarek.

So basically, they had a 25+ year old franchise whose original audience had largely been in elementary school children that only remembered the bare outline of the series and who are adults rather than kids now anyway... and the original fairly cool premise with a handfull of characters being used in roughly the same way as they were in the orignal (at least through the mini-series). That gave a lot of lattitude for reboot. Although, most of the differences from the original to the miniseries weren't in story so much as in execution.

The story of the reboot miniseries -- the planets were destroyed, Adama had the only remaining Battlestar, (the other remaining Battlestar showing up later in both series), Baltar as the sell-out to the Cylons, Apollo and Starbuck as the featured favorite fighter pilots on the front lines, and the ultimate, scary decision to try to find the lost colony -- Earth ... was all the same, just instead of pure cheese it was given a far more gritty, adult treatment. It basically took the original concept and characters, gave it an update and superior writing, and added just a couple of twists (there was no Roslin in the original. Boomer was a guy and Athena was just a female pilot and not a cylon, cylons were easily spotted what with their being metal and all). It was both recognizable (to folks who only barely remembered the first with affection from their childhoods) and better. Because of that, it was a reboot that worked.

The other reboot that worked is the recent Trek reboot. Yes, the reboot is spiffy. And it had the JJ Abrams cult cred as he's a sci-fi guru in his own right. Gene Roddenberry couldn't be offended as he died several years ago. Majel Barret, his widow, gave the reboot her go-ahead before she died. The original cast are now far beyond their sci-fi action hero stages (and a few of them have passed away), and even then the reboot still called Leonard Nimoy back into active duty and gave him a significant role... his original role. He was still Spock.

And it's hard to miss that the Trek reboot delivered a significant dose of nostalgia in a fun way. It gave the bang and glitz and hotties for a new generation, while delighting fans by giving us the relationships and the notes we loved. I remember cracking up at the away mission when it was Kirk, Sulu... and a Red Shirt. And of course the red shirt immediately died! Loved that. People in the audience got the shout-out, were in on the joke, and enjoyed that nod to Trek history. People enjoyed the heck out of Sulu announcing that he could fence, then his kicking ass fencing. Keith Urban's Bones characterization was one big ol' hommage to DeForest Kelly. It was a treat. That was McCoy almost exactly as we knew him... only younger and hotter. But, still, it was recognizably him. And Scottie! Uhura! Chekov! Even Pike! (in a wheelchair no less). And of course, we finally got to see Kirk sabotage the Kobayashi Maru. (Spock losing his shit over it was a bonus!)

So much of the Trek Reboot was simply about re-introducing us to the old characters we loved in younger form, and then showing us that these were still the characters we loved. And the relationships we loved. They didn't skimp on the Kirk/Spock (or the Kirk/McCoy). If you're going to do TOS Trek, you have to honor those relationships. It wasn't just that Kirk was recognizably the same character. It wasn't that we had not one but two Spocks. It was that the friendship of Kirk/Spock was paramount. Hell, the friendship of the entire crew was paramount. The joy of the reboot was getting the old gang back together and proving to us, that despite the younger faces and bods... they were still the old gang. And we still got Spock, original version showing us why we loved the original version all along.

It was also pretty brilliant of Abrams that he allowed the original timeline to stand undisturbed, telling us -- quite literally -- this is an alternate timeline. The Trek Reboot worked because it used the relationships of the original and gave it its own different place... and made it fun. Somewhere in my LJ is my review of the Trek reboot when it came out and I remember saying something along the lines of it delivered what it had to -- it gave us the characters we loved and showed us why we loved them all over again.

I think most reboots that work tend to be ones that have enough age to them that there's nostalgia supporting them. Nostalgia (helpful if perhaps our memories have clouded with time) and the relationships and characters we love in the way that we love them.

Give me another fifteen years and I may be all for an X-Files reboot (still, please no continuation. The series had a 10+ year run. They exhausted the material.) But it really just hurt to watch the last X-Files movie because, though I could believe the way that things had changed in the story, that wasn't really the Mulder/Scully I loved. The Mulder/Scully I loved were bullheaded rogue FBI agents not people in a mid-life identity crisis having retired and wondering what to do with their lives.

I liked the way that the series ended -- yes, even the out-of-gas ending of the series finale, because it left Mulder and Scully fighting the good fight... together. That's what I wanted. That's the way I like to remember them -- so Chris Carter, quit screwing them up by bringing them back! Maybe in fifteen years I'll feel differently and someone can do a reboot and I'll squee, but for the time being, I like my originals just the way they were.

(And honestly, what's the point in rebooting the Kristie Swanson movie when it was the Fox and Mutant Enemy Buffy characters and stories that we loved? What's next, Harry Potter sans Ron, Hermione, Ginny, Voldemort, Snape, or Hogwarts and without the blessing of JK Rowling?)
shipperx: (Scully - What a doof)
So, I posted The Hunger Games meta, but I also followed the results of my poll and cracked open the X-Files DVDs. Wanting to go light, I chose War of the Coprophages which, damn, is still awesome. It's really too bad that Darin Morgan kind of whigged out and quit writing, because he had the weirdest, wonderful, funny writing going on.

I mean, sure, anyone could make an episode about killer cockroaches (but why?!) but to turn it into hilarious wierdness was his gift. The oddity of characters giving insanely overly detailed exposition on weird topics? Plus banter and MSR UST? He did it all.

Mulder: I know it's not your inclination but did you ever look up into the night sky and feel certain that not only was something up there but that it was looking down on you at that exact same moment and was just as curious about you as you are about it?
(Cut to Scully on the other end of the phone line...cleaning her gun.)
SCULLY: I think the only thing more fortuitous than the emergence of life on this planet is that through purely random laws of biological evolution, an intelligence as complex as ours ever emanated from it. (Puts her gun back together) The very idea of intelligent alien life is not only astronomically improbable but at it's downright anti-Darwinian.
MULDER: (beat) Scully, what are you wearing?

*snerk* Of course he was turned on.

Mulder calling Scully at home with whatever bizarre death he just stumbled across (He has theories...aliens! It must be aliens!... or killer cockroaches. *snerk*) Only to be shot down again and again.
Read more... )
[Next Phone Call]
SCULLY: (Laying on her sofa reading Breakfast at Tiffany's)Who died now?
MULDER: The medical examiner. His body was found next to a toilet... covered in roaches. I really think you should come--
SCULLY: A toilet? Check his eyes. Is one of them bloodshot with a dilated pupil?
MULDER: (beat) Yeah.
SCULLY: It's probably a brain aneurysm.
MULDER: Brain aneurysm?!
SCULLY: Straining too forcefully is very common causation for bursting a brain aneurysm.
MULDER: Well (defensive now) how do you explain the cock roaches?
SCULLY: Did you catch any?
MULDER: [No.] Almost.
SCULLY: I don't know what to tell you, Mulder. I just hope you're not implying you've come across an infestation of killer cockroaches. [heh]

[Next Phone Call (skipping a few. The first half of the episode is a series of phone calls.]
SCULLY: (In bed, having been asleep) Mulder, are you okay?
MULDER: (also in bed) Yeah. I can't sleep.
SCULLY: What happened at the U.S.D.A. site?
MULDER:(a little put out) They're conducting legitimate experiments. (brightens) I met an entomologist, Doctor Berenbaum, who agrees with your theory of an accidental importation of a new cockroach species.
SCULLY: Did he give you any idea of how to catch them?
MULDER: No, but she did tell me everything else there is to know about insects.
SCULLY: She?
MULDER:Did you know that the ancient Egyptians worshiped the scarab beetle and possibly erected the pyramids to honor them, which may make them just giant symbolic dung heaps?
SCULLY: (Uninterested) Did you know the inventor of the flush toilet was named Thomas Crapper?
MULDER: Bambi also has this theory I've never come acro--
SCULLY: Who?
MULDER: Doctor Berenbaum. Anyway, her theory is--
SCULLY: Her name is Bambi?
MULDER: Yeah. Both her parents were naturalists. Anyway, her theory is that UFOs are nocturnal insect swarms passing through electrical field--.
SCULLY: Her name is Bambi?
MULDER: Scully, can I confess something to you?
SCULLY: Yeah, sure. Okay.
MULDER: I hate insects.
SCULLY: Lots of people are afraid of insects. It's a natural instinct.
MULDER: No, I'm not afraid of them. I hate them. When I was a kid, I was climbing this tree when I noticed this leaf walking towards me. It took forever for me to realize that it wasn't a leaf.
SCULLY: A praying mantis?
MULDER: Yeah. I had a praying mantis epiphany and, as a result, I screamed... not a girlie scream, but the scream of someone confronted by some unknown monster that had no right existing on the same planet that I inhabited.
SCULLY: Mulder, are you sure it wasn't a girlie scream?

Cock roach runs across the entire television screen (looking like it's on the viewer's television screen)
Read more... )

And the episode coda:

SHERIFF: I don't think we're going to locate the doctor's remains.
MULDER: Or anything else, for that matter.
SHERIFF: It's not as bad as some of the other fires we had last night.
SCULLY: There were others?
SHERIFF: Four, to be exact. Plus eighteen auto accidents, thirteen assault and batteries, two stores were looted, thirty-six injuries all total, half of them from insecticide poisoning. But, we didn't receive reports on cockroaches or otherwise for the last couple of hours. Maybe this town's finally come to its senses. You two ought to go home and get some rest.
PROFESSOR IVANOV: Agent Mulder? Those, segments you showed me earlier, may I examine them again?
MULDER: (Pulls out small bag) They're completely desiccated just like the molted exoskeleton.
BAMBI: You know, many insects don't develop wings until their last molting stage. Perhaps whatever these things were, they had their final molt and have flown off back to wherever they originated.
SCULLY: Yeah (Doubtful) That would explain everything.
(Mulder shoots her a 'look'.)
IVANOV: May I borrow for further study?
MULDER:(shrugs) What do you hope to find ?
BAMBI: (fascinated by IVANOV) His destiny.
IVANOV: Isn't that what Doctor Zaius said to Zira at the end of "The Planet of the Apes?"
(Bambi nods. Smiling.)
BAMBI: It's one of my favorite movies.
IVANOV: Mine too. I love science fiction.
BAMBI: (To IVANOV) I'm fascinated by your research. (She and the doctor head off.) Have you ever considered programming robots to mimic the behavior of social insects like ants or bees?
IVANOV: As a matter of fact, I have...
(Mulder watches saddened and a little peeved.)
SCULLY: (Noticing) Smart is sexy.
(Mulder shoots her another 'look.')
SCULLY:Think of it this way. By the time there's another invasion of artificially-intelligent, dung-eating robotic probes from outer space, maybe their uber-children will have devised a way to save our planet...
(Aggravated, Mulder takes the umbrella and leaves...)


Heh. When the X-Files was good, it could be exceedingly fun. :)
shipperx: (Scully - What a doof)
So, I posted The Hunger Games meta, but I also followed the results of my poll and cracked open the X-Files DVDs. Wanting to go light, I chose War of the Coprophages which, damn, is still awesome. It's really too bad that Darin Morgan kind of whigged out and quit writing, because he had the weirdest, wonderful, funny writing going on.

I mean, sure, anyone could make an episode about killer cockroaches (but why?!) but to turn it into hilarious wierdness was his gift. The oddity of characters giving insanely overly detailed exposition on weird topics? Plus banter and MSR UST? He did it all.

Mulder: I know it's not your inclination but did you ever look up into the night sky and feel certain that not only was something up there but that it was looking down on you at that exact same moment and was just as curious about you as you are about it?
(Cut to Scully on the other end of the phone line...cleaning her gun.)
SCULLY: I think the only thing more fortuitous than the emergence of life on this planet is that through purely random laws of biological evolution, an intelligence as complex as ours ever emanated from it. (Puts her gun back together) The very idea of intelligent alien life is not only astronomically improbable but at it's downright anti-Darwinian.
MULDER: (beat) Scully, what are you wearing?

*snerk* Of course he was turned on.

Mulder calling Scully at home with whatever bizarre death he just stumbled across (He has theories...aliens! It must be aliens!... or killer cockroaches. *snerk*) Only to be shot down again and again.
Read more... )
[Next Phone Call]
SCULLY: (Laying on her sofa reading Breakfast at Tiffany's)Who died now?
MULDER: The medical examiner. His body was found next to a toilet... covered in roaches. I really think you should come--
SCULLY: A toilet? Check his eyes. Is one of them bloodshot with a dilated pupil?
MULDER: (beat) Yeah.
SCULLY: It's probably a brain aneurysm.
MULDER: Brain aneurysm?!
SCULLY: Straining too forcefully is very common causation for bursting a brain aneurysm.
MULDER: Well (defensive now) how do you explain the cock roaches?
SCULLY: Did you catch any?
MULDER: [No.] Almost.
SCULLY: I don't know what to tell you, Mulder. I just hope you're not implying you've come across an infestation of killer cockroaches. [heh]

[Next Phone Call (skipping a few. The first half of the episode is a series of phone calls.]
SCULLY: (In bed, having been asleep) Mulder, are you okay?
MULDER: (also in bed) Yeah. I can't sleep.
SCULLY: What happened at the U.S.D.A. site?
MULDER:(a little put out) They're conducting legitimate experiments. (brightens) I met an entomologist, Doctor Berenbaum, who agrees with your theory of an accidental importation of a new cockroach species.
SCULLY: Did he give you any idea of how to catch them?
MULDER: No, but she did tell me everything else there is to know about insects.
SCULLY: She?
MULDER:Did you know that the ancient Egyptians worshiped the scarab beetle and possibly erected the pyramids to honor them, which may make them just giant symbolic dung heaps?
SCULLY: (Uninterested) Did you know the inventor of the flush toilet was named Thomas Crapper?
MULDER: Bambi also has this theory I've never come acro--
SCULLY: Who?
MULDER: Doctor Berenbaum. Anyway, her theory is--
SCULLY: Her name is Bambi?
MULDER: Yeah. Both her parents were naturalists. Anyway, her theory is that UFOs are nocturnal insect swarms passing through electrical field--.
SCULLY: Her name is Bambi?
MULDER: Scully, can I confess something to you?
SCULLY: Yeah, sure. Okay.
MULDER: I hate insects.
SCULLY: Lots of people are afraid of insects. It's a natural instinct.
MULDER: No, I'm not afraid of them. I hate them. When I was a kid, I was climbing this tree when I noticed this leaf walking towards me. It took forever for me to realize that it wasn't a leaf.
SCULLY: A praying mantis?
MULDER: Yeah. I had a praying mantis epiphany and, as a result, I screamed... not a girlie scream, but the scream of someone confronted by some unknown monster that had no right existing on the same planet that I inhabited.
SCULLY: Mulder, are you sure it wasn't a girlie scream?

Cock roach runs across the entire television screen (looking like it's on the viewer's television screen)
Read more... )

And the episode coda:

SHERIFF: I don't think we're going to locate the doctor's remains.
MULDER: Or anything else, for that matter.
SHERIFF: It's not as bad as some of the other fires we had last night.
SCULLY: There were others?
SHERIFF: Four, to be exact. Plus eighteen auto accidents, thirteen assault and batteries, two stores were looted, thirty-six injuries all total, half of them from insecticide poisoning. But, we didn't receive reports on cockroaches or otherwise for the last couple of hours. Maybe this town's finally come to its senses. You two ought to go home and get some rest.
PROFESSOR IVANOV: Agent Mulder? Those, segments you showed me earlier, may I examine them again?
MULDER: (Pulls out small bag) They're completely desiccated just like the molted exoskeleton.
BAMBI: You know, many insects don't develop wings until their last molting stage. Perhaps whatever these things were, they had their final molt and have flown off back to wherever they originated.
SCULLY: Yeah (Doubtful) That would explain everything.
(Mulder shoots her a 'look'.)
IVANOV: May I borrow for further study?
MULDER:(shrugs) What do you hope to find ?
BAMBI: (fascinated by IVANOV) His destiny.
IVANOV: Isn't that what Doctor Zaius said to Zira at the end of "The Planet of the Apes?"
(Bambi nods. Smiling.)
BAMBI: It's one of my favorite movies.
IVANOV: Mine too. I love science fiction.
BAMBI: (To IVANOV) I'm fascinated by your research. (She and the doctor head off.) Have you ever considered programming robots to mimic the behavior of social insects like ants or bees?
IVANOV: As a matter of fact, I have...
(Mulder watches saddened and a little peeved.)
SCULLY: (Noticing) Smart is sexy.
(Mulder shoots her another 'look.')
SCULLY:Think of it this way. By the time there's another invasion of artificially-intelligent, dung-eating robotic probes from outer space, maybe their uber-children will have devised a way to save our planet...
(Aggravated, Mulder takes the umbrella and leaves...)


Heh. When the X-Files was good, it could be exceedingly fun. :)
shipperx: (Scully - What a doof)
So, I posted The Hunger Games meta, but I also followed the results of my poll and cracked open the X-Files DVDs. Wanting to go light, I chose War of the Coprophages which, damn, is still awesome. It's really too bad that Darin Morgan kind of whigged out and quit writing, because he had the weirdest, wonderful, funny writing going on.

I mean, sure, anyone could make an episode about killer cockroaches (but why?!) but to turn it into hilarious wierdness was his gift. The oddity of characters giving insanely overly detailed exposition on weird topics? Plus banter and MSR UST? He did it all.

Mulder: I know it's not your inclination but did you ever look up into the night sky and feel certain that not only was something up there but that it was looking down on you at that exact same moment and was just as curious about you as you are about it?
(Cut to Scully on the other end of the phone line...cleaning her gun.)
SCULLY: I think the only thing more fortuitous than the emergence of life on this planet is that through purely random laws of biological evolution, an intelligence as complex as ours ever emanated from it. (Puts her gun back together) The very idea of intelligent alien life is not only astronomically improbable but at it's downright anti-Darwinian.
MULDER: (beat) Scully, what are you wearing?

*snerk* Of course he was turned on.

Mulder calling Scully at home with whatever bizarre death he just stumbled across (He has theories...aliens! It must be aliens!... or killer cockroaches. *snerk*) Only to be shot down again and again.
Read more... )
[Next Phone Call]
SCULLY: (Laying on her sofa reading Breakfast at Tiffany's)Who died now?
MULDER: The medical examiner. His body was found next to a toilet... covered in roaches. I really think you should come--
SCULLY: A toilet? Check his eyes. Is one of them bloodshot with a dilated pupil?
MULDER: (beat) Yeah.
SCULLY: It's probably a brain aneurysm.
MULDER: Brain aneurysm?!
SCULLY: Straining too forcefully is very common causation for bursting a brain aneurysm.
MULDER: Well (defensive now) how do you explain the cock roaches?
SCULLY: Did you catch any?
MULDER: [No.] Almost.
SCULLY: I don't know what to tell you, Mulder. I just hope you're not implying you've come across an infestation of killer cockroaches. [heh]

[Next Phone Call (skipping a few. The first half of the episode is a series of phone calls.]
SCULLY: (In bed, having been asleep) Mulder, are you okay?
MULDER: (also in bed) Yeah. I can't sleep.
SCULLY: What happened at the U.S.D.A. site?
MULDER:(a little put out) They're conducting legitimate experiments. (brightens) I met an entomologist, Doctor Berenbaum, who agrees with your theory of an accidental importation of a new cockroach species.
SCULLY: Did he give you any idea of how to catch them?
MULDER: No, but she did tell me everything else there is to know about insects.
SCULLY: She?
MULDER:Did you know that the ancient Egyptians worshiped the scarab beetle and possibly erected the pyramids to honor them, which may make them just giant symbolic dung heaps?
SCULLY: (Uninterested) Did you know the inventor of the flush toilet was named Thomas Crapper?
MULDER: Bambi also has this theory I've never come acro--
SCULLY: Who?
MULDER: Doctor Berenbaum. Anyway, her theory is--
SCULLY: Her name is Bambi?
MULDER: Yeah. Both her parents were naturalists. Anyway, her theory is that UFOs are nocturnal insect swarms passing through electrical field--.
SCULLY: Her name is Bambi?
MULDER: Scully, can I confess something to you?
SCULLY: Yeah, sure. Okay.
MULDER: I hate insects.
SCULLY: Lots of people are afraid of insects. It's a natural instinct.
MULDER: No, I'm not afraid of them. I hate them. When I was a kid, I was climbing this tree when I noticed this leaf walking towards me. It took forever for me to realize that it wasn't a leaf.
SCULLY: A praying mantis?
MULDER: Yeah. I had a praying mantis epiphany and, as a result, I screamed... not a girlie scream, but the scream of someone confronted by some unknown monster that had no right existing on the same planet that I inhabited.
SCULLY: Mulder, are you sure it wasn't a girlie scream?

Cock roach runs across the entire television screen (looking like it's on the viewer's television screen)
Read more... )

And the episode coda:

SHERIFF: I don't think we're going to locate the doctor's remains.
MULDER: Or anything else, for that matter.
SHERIFF: It's not as bad as some of the other fires we had last night.
SCULLY: There were others?
SHERIFF: Four, to be exact. Plus eighteen auto accidents, thirteen assault and batteries, two stores were looted, thirty-six injuries all total, half of them from insecticide poisoning. But, we didn't receive reports on cockroaches or otherwise for the last couple of hours. Maybe this town's finally come to its senses. You two ought to go home and get some rest.
PROFESSOR IVANOV: Agent Mulder? Those, segments you showed me earlier, may I examine them again?
MULDER: (Pulls out small bag) They're completely desiccated just like the molted exoskeleton.
BAMBI: You know, many insects don't develop wings until their last molting stage. Perhaps whatever these things were, they had their final molt and have flown off back to wherever they originated.
SCULLY: Yeah (Doubtful) That would explain everything.
(Mulder shoots her a 'look'.)
IVANOV: May I borrow for further study?
MULDER:(shrugs) What do you hope to find ?
BAMBI: (fascinated by IVANOV) His destiny.
IVANOV: Isn't that what Doctor Zaius said to Zira at the end of "The Planet of the Apes?"
(Bambi nods. Smiling.)
BAMBI: It's one of my favorite movies.
IVANOV: Mine too. I love science fiction.
BAMBI: (To IVANOV) I'm fascinated by your research. (She and the doctor head off.) Have you ever considered programming robots to mimic the behavior of social insects like ants or bees?
IVANOV: As a matter of fact, I have...
(Mulder watches saddened and a little peeved.)
SCULLY: (Noticing) Smart is sexy.
(Mulder shoots her another 'look.')
SCULLY:Think of it this way. By the time there's another invasion of artificially-intelligent, dung-eating robotic probes from outer space, maybe their uber-children will have devised a way to save our planet...
(Aggravated, Mulder takes the umbrella and leaves...)


Heh. When the X-Files was good, it could be exceedingly fun. :)

XF DVDs

Aug. 23rd, 2010 02:23 pm
shipperx: (Scully - What a doof)
So Amazon had X-Files DVDs on sale for $13.99 yesterday. I couldn't bring myself to shell out for all the seasons, but I did snap up my favorite seasons (3,4,5). It's a start! Plus, it has some great episodes that I haven't seen in a while.

XF DVDs

Aug. 23rd, 2010 02:23 pm
shipperx: (Scully - What a doof)
So Amazon had X-Files DVDs on sale for $13.99 yesterday. I couldn't bring myself to shell out for all the seasons, but I did snap up my favorite seasons (3,4,5). It's a start! Plus, it has some great episodes that I haven't seen in a while.

XF DVDs

Aug. 23rd, 2010 02:23 pm
shipperx: (Scully - What a doof)
So Amazon had X-Files DVDs on sale for $13.99 yesterday. I couldn't bring myself to shell out for all the seasons, but I did snap up my favorite seasons (3,4,5). It's a start! Plus, it has some great episodes that I haven't seen in a while.
shipperx: (Scully - I want to believe)
Today was my bi-weekly day off, which means that I still went into the office and worked a half day. However, it also means that I took the afternoon off and went to see the X-File movie.

Thus far I haven't read anyone else's reaction to it, and I also didn't bother to read any reviews of the movie. In this particular case, any review would be pointless. I was a hard core X-phile back in the day and even if told the movie sucked, come hell or high water, I'd still go to see it. So now, even though I've said that reviews are pointless, here are my thoughts and...er... I guess it's a review.

Points for unspoiled consumption:
* It's a mixed review. The script could have stood two or three more drafts. If it had been tightened and the points more well defined, it would have (generally speaking)been a better movie.
* As far as I can tell this movie is made not for the general public consumption but for hard core X-philes. Actually, I don't think its primary audience is even all X-Philes as I don't know how Noromo's would take it. This movie was written for hardcore X-File shippers. (Not that I consider that to be a criticism because hard core X-File shipper right here.) If you boil this movie down to its essentials, it's all about the ship (and I'm saying that as part of the writing not as a shipper).
* Does it deliver for shippers? Well, it's complicated. As far as I can tell, the Mulder/Scully relationship, exploring it in an almost meditative way is the only purpose of the movie and the plot is created entirely to play off of that (which is why I said that its target audience are people who shipped them in a relatively serious manner because even as shipping goes, it's not targetted for OMG! Squee! (though it does deliver some squee-worthy moments). It's more... I don't know, adult(?) than that. It's not puppies and kittens, glitter or rip his shirt off passion. It's two people in a long term (over a decade now) relationship. It's that established, that real, and that flawed. It is real love, though. But we always knew that.

And I'll discuss it with spoilers behind the cut, because if anyone who has seen it wants to discuss it, I'd really like to because I'd like to know the conclusions someone else drew from it.

More in dept pondering behind the cut )
shipperx: (Scully - I want to believe)
Today was my bi-weekly day off, which means that I still went into the office and worked a half day. However, it also means that I took the afternoon off and went to see the X-File movie.

Thus far I haven't read anyone else's reaction to it, and I also didn't bother to read any reviews of the movie. In this particular case, any review would be pointless. I was a hard core X-phile back in the day and even if told the movie sucked, come hell or high water, I'd still go to see it. So now, even though I've said that reviews are pointless, here are my thoughts and...er... I guess it's a review.

Points for unspoiled consumption:
* It's a mixed review. The script could have stood two or three more drafts. If it had been tightened and the points more well defined, it would have (generally speaking)been a better movie.
* As far as I can tell this movie is made not for the general public consumption but for hard core X-philes. Actually, I don't think its primary audience is even all X-Philes as I don't know how Noromo's would take it. This movie was written for hardcore X-File shippers. (Not that I consider that to be a criticism because hard core X-File shipper right here.) If you boil this movie down to its essentials, it's all about the ship (and I'm saying that as part of the writing not as a shipper).
* Does it deliver for shippers? Well, it's complicated. As far as I can tell, the Mulder/Scully relationship, exploring it in an almost meditative way is the only purpose of the movie and the plot is created entirely to play off of that (which is why I said that its target audience are people who shipped them in a relatively serious manner because even as shipping goes, it's not targetted for OMG! Squee! (though it does deliver some squee-worthy moments). It's more... I don't know, adult(?) than that. It's not puppies and kittens, glitter or rip his shirt off passion. It's two people in a long term (over a decade now) relationship. It's that established, that real, and that flawed. It is real love, though. But we always knew that.

And I'll discuss it with spoilers behind the cut, because if anyone who has seen it wants to discuss it, I'd really like to because I'd like to know the conclusions someone else drew from it.

More in dept pondering behind the cut )
shipperx: (Scully - I want to believe)
Today was my bi-weekly day off, which means that I still went into the office and worked a half day. However, it also means that I took the afternoon off and went to see the X-File movie.

Thus far I haven't read anyone else's reaction to it, and I also didn't bother to read any reviews of the movie. In this particular case, any review would be pointless. I was a hard core X-phile back in the day and even if told the movie sucked, come hell or high water, I'd still go to see it. So now, even though I've said that reviews are pointless, here are my thoughts and...er... I guess it's a review.

Points for unspoiled consumption:
* It's a mixed review. The script could have stood two or three more drafts. If it had been tightened and the points more well defined, it would have (generally speaking)been a better movie.
* As far as I can tell this movie is made not for the general public consumption but for hard core X-philes. Actually, I don't think its primary audience is even all X-Philes as I don't know how Noromo's would take it. This movie was written for hardcore X-File shippers. (Not that I consider that to be a criticism because hard core X-File shipper right here.) If you boil this movie down to its essentials, it's all about the ship (and I'm saying that as part of the writing not as a shipper).
* Does it deliver for shippers? Well, it's complicated. As far as I can tell, the Mulder/Scully relationship, exploring it in an almost meditative way is the only purpose of the movie and the plot is created entirely to play off of that (which is why I said that its target audience are people who shipped them in a relatively serious manner because even as shipping goes, it's not targetted for OMG! Squee! (though it does deliver some squee-worthy moments). It's more... I don't know, adult(?) than that. It's not puppies and kittens, glitter or rip his shirt off passion. It's two people in a long term (over a decade now) relationship. It's that established, that real, and that flawed. It is real love, though. But we always knew that.

And I'll discuss it with spoilers behind the cut, because if anyone who has seen it wants to discuss it, I'd really like to because I'd like to know the conclusions someone else drew from it.

More in dept pondering behind the cut )
shipperx: (Scully - I want to believe)
[personal profile] petzipellepingo sent this link to a Salon.com article, and I must admit that this article really sums up a great deal of my love for the show:

Scully I Have Loved

Dead on quotes:

"In this summer of Dark Knights and Hellboys and Iron Men, it's refreshing to be reminded -- as we will be this weekend, with the opening of "The-X-Files: I Want to Believe" -- that not so long ago, there was a science fiction series with a woman at its core, a heroine whose major goals were more about disproving the existence of extraterrestrial life than marrying Big, a chick who spent more time chasing fluke worms down toilets than trying on shoes. "

Not that shoes are bad, mind you. They just don't make an appropriate after-apocalypse diversion (yeah, I know the quote was about Carrie Bradshaw and not Buffy, but Carrie has enough problems being stuck with Big.  Yech.)

"Sure, Mulder was hot, and made you want to heal and help him and go with him to the Andes in search of the yeti or whatever it was he planning to do with his three-day weekend.  But the one I would have gone to the ends of the earth for was Scully. Patient, long-suffering, geeky forensic pathologist Scully, so short and tucked and tailored. Given such a tough role -- as the woman brought in by the FBI to be the minder and school marm, as Mulder correctly says in the first episode, to spy on him -- Scully was supposed to be able take away his toys and crush his dreams of ghouls and goblins. {...} But as the show matured, it was Scully -- the cerebral head of the X-Files, torn between her Catholic faith, her scientific impulse to explain away the inexplicable and her affection for her partner -- who was destined to become the (still cerebral) heart of the show. "

And

"Scully was a leading lady to fall for, a smart-girl icon who was (and would still be, alas) a rare television bird: professional, independent, unsentimental. She liked boys' things: Her favorite movie was "The Exorcist," her favorite book the phallic classic "Moby-Dick"; her nickname from her father was Starbuck; she wrote her thesis on Einstein's twin paradox.  {...} Dana Scully was not standard television beautiful, but a diminutive pre-Raphaelite, pale of skin and red of hair, who could give equal amounts of soul to lines like "Nothing happens in contradiction to nature, just in contradiction to what we know of it" and "Well, seeing as how it's Friday, I was thinking I could get some work done on that monograph I'm writing for the penology review: 'Diminished Acetylcholine Production in Recidivist Offenders.'" A woman who, when asked by her pestering partner to examine a cadaver's head just one more time for a set of horns, can snap on her gloves and mutter "Whatever" like she really means it."

And finally:

"In an entertainment world where women are disappearing from multiplexes, where men bulk up as superheroes while women don't eat but sip pink drinks, we need to remember that there was once a very short heroine who hunted monsters and talked about Einstein, who kicked ass and questioned her faith, who went to work with a man she loved but didn't rip his shirt off over lunch, who didn't want to believe, but opened herself nonetheless to possibility."

The whole article is good.  And, yes, Scully remains one of the very best.


 
shipperx: (Scully - I want to believe)
[personal profile] petzipellepingo sent this link to a Salon.com article, and I must admit that this article really sums up a great deal of my love for the show:

Scully I Have Loved

Dead on quotes:

"In this summer of Dark Knights and Hellboys and Iron Men, it's refreshing to be reminded -- as we will be this weekend, with the opening of "The-X-Files: I Want to Believe" -- that not so long ago, there was a science fiction series with a woman at its core, a heroine whose major goals were more about disproving the existence of extraterrestrial life than marrying Big, a chick who spent more time chasing fluke worms down toilets than trying on shoes. "

Not that shoes are bad, mind you. They just don't make an appropriate after-apocalypse diversion (yeah, I know the quote was about Carrie Bradshaw and not Buffy, but Carrie has enough problems being stuck with Big.  Yech.)

"Sure, Mulder was hot, and made you want to heal and help him and go with him to the Andes in search of the yeti or whatever it was he planning to do with his three-day weekend.  But the one I would have gone to the ends of the earth for was Scully. Patient, long-suffering, geeky forensic pathologist Scully, so short and tucked and tailored. Given such a tough role -- as the woman brought in by the FBI to be the minder and school marm, as Mulder correctly says in the first episode, to spy on him -- Scully was supposed to be able take away his toys and crush his dreams of ghouls and goblins. {...} But as the show matured, it was Scully -- the cerebral head of the X-Files, torn between her Catholic faith, her scientific impulse to explain away the inexplicable and her affection for her partner -- who was destined to become the (still cerebral) heart of the show. "

And

"Scully was a leading lady to fall for, a smart-girl icon who was (and would still be, alas) a rare television bird: professional, independent, unsentimental. She liked boys' things: Her favorite movie was "The Exorcist," her favorite book the phallic classic "Moby-Dick"; her nickname from her father was Starbuck; she wrote her thesis on Einstein's twin paradox.  {...} Dana Scully was not standard television beautiful, but a diminutive pre-Raphaelite, pale of skin and red of hair, who could give equal amounts of soul to lines like "Nothing happens in contradiction to nature, just in contradiction to what we know of it" and "Well, seeing as how it's Friday, I was thinking I could get some work done on that monograph I'm writing for the penology review: 'Diminished Acetylcholine Production in Recidivist Offenders.'" A woman who, when asked by her pestering partner to examine a cadaver's head just one more time for a set of horns, can snap on her gloves and mutter "Whatever" like she really means it."

And finally:

"In an entertainment world where women are disappearing from multiplexes, where men bulk up as superheroes while women don't eat but sip pink drinks, we need to remember that there was once a very short heroine who hunted monsters and talked about Einstein, who kicked ass and questioned her faith, who went to work with a man she loved but didn't rip his shirt off over lunch, who didn't want to believe, but opened herself nonetheless to possibility."

The whole article is good.  And, yes, Scully remains one of the very best.


 
shipperx: (Scully - I want to believe)
[personal profile] petzipellepingo sent this link to a Salon.com article, and I must admit that this article really sums up a great deal of my love for the show:

Scully I Have Loved

Dead on quotes:

"In this summer of Dark Knights and Hellboys and Iron Men, it's refreshing to be reminded -- as we will be this weekend, with the opening of "The-X-Files: I Want to Believe" -- that not so long ago, there was a science fiction series with a woman at its core, a heroine whose major goals were more about disproving the existence of extraterrestrial life than marrying Big, a chick who spent more time chasing fluke worms down toilets than trying on shoes. "

Not that shoes are bad, mind you. They just don't make an appropriate after-apocalypse diversion (yeah, I know the quote was about Carrie Bradshaw and not Buffy, but Carrie has enough problems being stuck with Big.  Yech.)

"Sure, Mulder was hot, and made you want to heal and help him and go with him to the Andes in search of the yeti or whatever it was he planning to do with his three-day weekend.  But the one I would have gone to the ends of the earth for was Scully. Patient, long-suffering, geeky forensic pathologist Scully, so short and tucked and tailored. Given such a tough role -- as the woman brought in by the FBI to be the minder and school marm, as Mulder correctly says in the first episode, to spy on him -- Scully was supposed to be able take away his toys and crush his dreams of ghouls and goblins. {...} But as the show matured, it was Scully -- the cerebral head of the X-Files, torn between her Catholic faith, her scientific impulse to explain away the inexplicable and her affection for her partner -- who was destined to become the (still cerebral) heart of the show. "

And

"Scully was a leading lady to fall for, a smart-girl icon who was (and would still be, alas) a rare television bird: professional, independent, unsentimental. She liked boys' things: Her favorite movie was "The Exorcist," her favorite book the phallic classic "Moby-Dick"; her nickname from her father was Starbuck; she wrote her thesis on Einstein's twin paradox.  {...} Dana Scully was not standard television beautiful, but a diminutive pre-Raphaelite, pale of skin and red of hair, who could give equal amounts of soul to lines like "Nothing happens in contradiction to nature, just in contradiction to what we know of it" and "Well, seeing as how it's Friday, I was thinking I could get some work done on that monograph I'm writing for the penology review: 'Diminished Acetylcholine Production in Recidivist Offenders.'" A woman who, when asked by her pestering partner to examine a cadaver's head just one more time for a set of horns, can snap on her gloves and mutter "Whatever" like she really means it."

And finally:

"In an entertainment world where women are disappearing from multiplexes, where men bulk up as superheroes while women don't eat but sip pink drinks, we need to remember that there was once a very short heroine who hunted monsters and talked about Einstein, who kicked ass and questioned her faith, who went to work with a man she loved but didn't rip his shirt off over lunch, who didn't want to believe, but opened herself nonetheless to possibility."

The whole article is good.  And, yes, Scully remains one of the very best.


 
shipperx: (Scully - What a doof)
:
XF fic.

God, my memory of it has grown dim. I hit Gossamer (look at the old school, small bandwith version of "graphics!" hee!), to see whether there were any fanfics I'd read back in the day that I still remembered.

I have a vague memory of this Post-Hollywood AD ficlet by David Hearne: They Can Mess You Up.

Likewise, I vaguely remembered his post Je Souhaite fic Every Chimpanzee Has His Day

And his ficlet take on Bad Blood, the episode that gave Mulder's POV then Scully's POV (neither of which matched) so Hearne added Sheriff Hartwell's POV.

Hearne must have written a bunch of post-episode ficlets because I seem to remember several. I also remember that he was a nice guy.

The fic that was always rec'd everywhere in the XF fandom (or at least in the corners where I hung out) was Rivka T's and Mustang Sally's Iolokus (though, I'll be perfectly honest and say that I preferred their Spuffy fic's The Heart's Filthy Lesson and Serious Moonlight . Not without quibble with them, but I enjoyed them and remember them with great fondness. Almost as much fondness as The BtVS virtual season Dancing Lessons... yeah, we'll ignore the kerfuffle that blew that one up. I've heard rumors that it's archived somewhere -- like maybe LiveJournal -- anyone know? I think I could bring myself to read Dancing Lessons again. )

I'll admit to having been one of the participants in the Yahoo-list (remember those?!) round-robin that produced the fic Cold Hands/Warm Heart (And, seriously, it was a round robin, so there was nothing remotely "plotted" about the thing. But, hey, I remember having fun with it. I shudder to think of reading it again. I don't think I could bring myself to do so. There's no telling how awful it was... but I have fun memories of the ficlist that created it.

Somehow (I don't remember how) that round robin became a late addition to the X-Files Virtual Season 8.

Later, I made my own contribution to Virtual Season 9 . (I won't dare read that either.) I was a newbie to fandom (and the world of sci-fi fandom fanfic) and no one told us then that these stories would still be hanging around the internet mocking us all these years later! Anyway I wrote the virtual "episode" Seeing is Believing .

And, searching Gossamer, I found my very, very first fanfic (God, how bad must that one be?! ::shudder::) Post-Requiem, Mobius
shipperx: (Scully - What a doof)
:
XF fic.

God, my memory of it has grown dim. I hit Gossamer (look at the old school, small bandwith version of "graphics!" hee!), to see whether there were any fanfics I'd read back in the day that I still remembered.

I have a vague memory of this Post-Hollywood AD ficlet by David Hearne: They Can Mess You Up.

Likewise, I vaguely remembered his post Je Souhaite fic Every Chimpanzee Has His Day

And his ficlet take on Bad Blood, the episode that gave Mulder's POV then Scully's POV (neither of which matched) so Hearne added Sheriff Hartwell's POV.

Hearne must have written a bunch of post-episode ficlets because I seem to remember several. I also remember that he was a nice guy.

The fic that was always rec'd everywhere in the XF fandom (or at least in the corners where I hung out) was Rivka T's and Mustang Sally's Iolokus (though, I'll be perfectly honest and say that I preferred their Spuffy fic's The Heart's Filthy Lesson and Serious Moonlight . Not without quibble with them, but I enjoyed them and remember them with great fondness. Almost as much fondness as The BtVS virtual season Dancing Lessons... yeah, we'll ignore the kerfuffle that blew that one up. I've heard rumors that it's archived somewhere -- like maybe LiveJournal -- anyone know? I think I could bring myself to read Dancing Lessons again. )

I'll admit to having been one of the participants in the Yahoo-list (remember those?!) round-robin that produced the fic Cold Hands/Warm Heart (And, seriously, it was a round robin, so there was nothing remotely "plotted" about the thing. But, hey, I remember having fun with it. I shudder to think of reading it again. I don't think I could bring myself to do so. There's no telling how awful it was... but I have fun memories of the ficlist that created it.

Somehow (I don't remember how) that round robin became a late addition to the X-Files Virtual Season 8.

Later, I made my own contribution to Virtual Season 9 . (I won't dare read that either.) I was a newbie to fandom (and the world of sci-fi fandom fanfic) and no one told us then that these stories would still be hanging around the internet mocking us all these years later! Anyway I wrote the virtual "episode" Seeing is Believing .

And, searching Gossamer, I found my very, very first fanfic (God, how bad must that one be?! ::shudder::) Post-Requiem, Mobius

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